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Machinery Photo Index
Manufactured/Badged by:
Sears | Craftsman
*

True Manufacturer:
Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO; Ferguson, MO; Paris, TN
Machine Specifications
Machine Class: Wood Working Machinery
Machine Type: Table Saw
Machine Size: 10"
Submitted By: Shawn Faucher
Machine Specifications
Description/Model: 113.29990 Craftsman '100' Tilt-Arbor Bench Saw
Date of Manufacturer: 1957
Serial Number: none
Last Updated 3/1/2012 6:25:37 AM

Comments:
Picked this up from a retired farmer in Illinois after I saw it in an ad on CL. He'd used it for 20+ years for various projects around the farm. Couldn't remember where he'd gotten it. It was in great shape with the original 1hp Craftsman motor, both sporting the original "power bronze" anniversary paint job. It sat on a base he'd made himself out of scrap metal, complete with fence and miter gage holders on the side. The fence was original, and one of the miters was an older craftsman, although sported the Craftsman gray paint so obviously wasn't original to this saw. The other miter he through in. It included a right size aluminum extension, including an original fence rail extension on the front.

I took it home and began restoration. I stripped everything down and cleaned it all up, then took the motor apart and installed new bearings and a new cord. It had run fine before, but there was obvious bearing noise. After that I primed and painted everything Rustoleum Burnished Brass Metallic enamel, which was a pretty good match for the original "power bronze" still unfaded on the inside of the motor housing. The main fence rail had one of the corners torn off, so I found another along with an extra extension rail and installed the former in place of the broken one. One thing I wish I hadn't done is buff away the detail on the chrome front-piece. Unfortunately I didn't realize the lines weren't machined into the metal and had a good portion of it rubbed off before I did, so the rest had to come off. It doesn't look too bad all shiny chrome, but the original lines had a nice character to them. Tilt and height adjustments worked smooth as can be after a little lubrication. Put it all back together and it just purrs. Doesn't skip a beat right through tough, knotty hardwood.

(Admin note, 17Jul07: revised date.)

Photo 1:

Comments: Original, from the front
Source: My Canon Powershot A610
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Photo 2:

Comments: Original from the back
Source: My Canon Powershot A610
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Photo 3:

Comments: Shiny and "new"
Source: My Canon Powershot A610
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