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Machinery Photo Index
Manufactured/Badged by:
Sears | Craftsman
*

True Manufacturer:
Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO; Ferguson, MO; Paris, TN
Machine Specifications
Machine Class: Wood Working Machinery
Machine Type: Shaper, Wood
Machine Size: ½"
Submitted By: Brian Kachadurian
Machine Specifications
Description/Model: 113.23940 Craftsman Spindle Shaper
Date of Manufacturer: 1966
Serial Number: none
Last Updated 4/9/2012 11:16:07 PM

Comments:
It was Friday 17Nov06. I innocently walked into a popular local new machine dealer in Birmingham Michigan. All I was doing was killing a few minutes on my way home from work. The last thing I expected to find was OWWM. There in the middle of the showroom floor were four used machines. The first item was a newer floor model commercial router table with a 'Sold' sign on it. Next to the router table was a nice looking 1960s Delta contractor style TS. Behind the TS was a Delta stationary biscuit cutting machine on an OEM sheet metal stand. Then, hiding behind the router table and TS extension, was a grid style cast iron topped machine. I froze...could it be? I stared at the visible section of grid table and then the weirdest thing happened...it winked at me...I swear! I walked around the aisle and there it was; a 1966 cast iron Craftsman/King-Seeley design Emerson built 1/2" spindle shaper. There it stood, on a cast iron Craftsman pedestal style stand. I reached under and moved the belt. The spindle turned with ease. I carefully pulled the machine from its original position to look at the back side. It was equipped with a 1HP Dayton motor, complete with reversing drum switch and wired for 230V. By now a clerk walked up to me. I asked him what was the story on these machines. He replied that one of their customers had passed and his widow wanted them to sell his machines. I asked how much they wanted for the shaper and he replied $100. My response was, "can you help me load it into the back of my PT Cruiser?".

The shaper is basically in great shape. Only some minor rust on the stand. The pulley had become loose at one time and slightly chewed the end of the spindle. That will be fixed next. The plug was an old style three prong for an A/C unit. I replaced the plug with the two horizontal blade type. Then I ran a 240V line into the shop and powered it up. It runs well in both directions.

The tall auxiliary oak fence was added by the previous owner, along with the nylon pads seen on the top of the base. Missing parts include the table insert and hold-down bars. For now, I'm just going to use it.

Photo 1:

Comments: Front view
Source: Canon S230 with flash in basement workshop
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Photo 2:

Comments: Fence and motor
Source: Canon S230 with flash in basement workshop
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