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Machinery Photo Index
Manufactured/Badged by:
Crescent Machine Co.
Leetonia, OH

Machine Specifications
Machine Class: Wood Working Machinery
Machine Type: Band Saw
Machine Size: 32"
Submitted By: Tom Wagler
Machine Specifications
Description/Model: 32" Band Saw
Date of Manufacturer: 1915 or so
Serial Number: (View SN Registry Entry)
Last Updated 1/31/2006 8:40:32 PM

Comments:
JUST TO UPDATE MY PHOTO INDEX SUBMISSION, I'VE FINALLY PICKED UP MY SAW AND NOW HAVE IT SAFELY TUCKED AWAY IN MY GARAGE. MANY THANKS TO THOSE WHO RESPONDED TO MY QUESTION ABOUT BEST TECHNIQUE FOR HOISTING, PARTICULARLY TO T.J. FORRESTER WHOSE EXPERIENCE AND ASTUTE COMMENTS ABOUT THE GREAT STRENGTH OF BANDSAW FRAMES (IE. BLADE TENSIONING LOAD IS FAR GREATER THAN LOAD IMPOSED FROM HOISTING) MADE IT CLEAR THAT IT WOULD BE FINE TO LIFT FROM UPPER ARM, COMPLETE WITH MOTOR, TABLES, ETC, ALL LEFT IN PLACE. THE LIFT FROM 2ND STOREY WENT FINE AND NEW PHOTOS ARE ATTACHED BELOW. SERIAL # 25436 WAS FOUND STAMPED INTO THE END OF UPPER WHEEL SHAFT. THIS WOULD DATE SAW TO ABOUT 1915 OR SO, I THINK.

I'm about to take possession of this 32" Crescent Machine Co. Band Saw. I spotted a small classified ad in the local flyer listing a "32" Bandsaw, antique, working condition, complete w/motor, price negotiable". This immediately tweaked my interest. A phone call to the owner revealed that he had purchased the saw in 1977 for his boat building business, located in Odessa, a small town near my hometown of Kingston, Ontario. He used it mainly for cutting boat bulkheads, but has retired, sold the boat yard, and is clearing out the buildings. He indicated that he did not know the manufacturer, but believed it to be 100 years old, based on a date of 1905 stamped on the base of the saw. He had purchased the saw from Anglin Lumberyards, which used to be a large operation in historic downtown Kingston at the turn of the century, comprised of a lumberyard & coalyard operation, and a window and sash factory. The owner indicated that the saw was still in good working condition, although he had not used it for the last 5 years or so. He had new babbit bearing poured for it upon his purchase of the saw in 1977.

I arranged for a visit and arrived at the boat yard location, a historic limestone block building, perched on the banks of Millhaven Creek in Odessa. The owner, a gruff European man speaking in accented voice, led me into the main building, through the large boat building bay, up a rickety set of stairs, to the second floor. A series of single bare lightbulbs dimly illuminated the room. A quick first glance at the saw revealed the distinctive "Crescent curves". The owner threw open the crudely fabricatd upper and lower guards and sure enough, the Crescent Machine Co, Leetonia, Ohio, Pat. Jan. 3, 1905 casting was revealed through the accumulated grime.

The saw has been converted from its original flat pulley drive with a modern 2 hp electric motor and v-belt. Everything appears complete and in good condition. The upper ball bearing guide has been replaced with a modern version. A small brass tag indicated the original sellers to be William & Wilson Ltd of Montreal. After some intensive negotiations (with the owner, but also mainly with my beautiful wife) the saw is mine. For some strange reason, according to my wife we don't need a second 850 lb lump of cast iron cluttering up the garage (the first being a Rockwell 12/14" Tilting Arbour Saw - but that's a whole nother story!).

A Google search has since revealed the wealth of information available on this amazing website about my band saw. I didn't spot the serial number on my first visit, but will be sure to get it and register the saw in the index once I pick up the saw. I think the owner is a bit off the mark with his 100 year old estimate - I think 1920's vintage is probably closer (1915 IS MORE LIKELY BASED ON SERIAL #). The next adventure will be somehow lowering this 850 lb beast to ground level and transporting it home. My plans are to keep it more or less in its as-found condition and put it into operation as working machine. It looks like this saw has never been re-painted. My only modification will be to change out the motor to a classic "Century Electric Motor Co.", 1950's vintage, 2 hp, repulsion-induction motor that I have squirreled away in my garage that once powered an "electric oats roller". This motor is the size of a small garbage can, with elegant intricate end-bell castings that will make it the perfect match for the vintage bandsaw.

Photo 1:

Comments: 32" Crescent Band Saw
Source: My Canon digital camera (with owners permission)
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Photo 2:

Comments: Hoisting saw from 2nd floor to trailer
Source: My Canon S110
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Photo 3:

Comments: Safe and secure for transport (No, the weight in not resting on the table)
Source: My Canon S110
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