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Manufactured/Badged by:
Delta Manufacturing Co.
Milwaukee, WI; Jackson, TN

Machine Specifications
Machine Class: Wood Working Machinery
Machine Type: Drill Press
Machine Size: 14" floor
Submitted By: Mike Fendley
Machine Specifications
Description/Model: DP 220
Date of Manufacturer: 1930s ?
Serial Number: No plate was attached
Last Updated 8/4/2015 10:19:59 PM

Comments:
In the process of selling a bench mount King-Seeley, Model 150 Craftsman, I had two people wanting it because it was old American iron. The first guy offered me my asking price, $250. However, a young gal wanting to start her own wood shop in order to repair her parents home on her own offered $300. Since the guy was first (but hadn’t shown up) I called and gave him the news. “I’ll match it” was his reply, and so it went to him. The gal was disappointed and I felt bad but I made her a deal. “If I find you a good American made DP to meet your wood working needs, and you buy it, I’ll restore it for you with your max out of pocket expense being $300 including the price of the DP.” We agreed to the deal and I found her a very old Delta 220 with the original motor and original lamp for $100. It cost me another $80 for parts and such, but I made $120 out of the deal, she was thrilled, and I may have a new customer for future tool restorations equipping her shop. Off and on it took about 4 days disassembling, cleaning, polishing, and painting the press. She wanted to know if she could come and help in putting it together so she could learn about her “new” press and I agreed. So with my wife and grandkids watching and handing parts and tools to us we took about 4 hours putting it altogether including the electrical. The motor was initially full of sanding dust, had been put together incorrectly (didn’t run) but the bearings were in great shape. The quill bearings were also in good shape but the spindle was too long for this press. My guess is that at some time in its long life it got a new spindle that was longer. An 11/16” hole in the top of the cone cover will allow the spindle to rise up just slightly and give the press a full 4” stroke. There were 6 - 3/16” holes in the base and five in the table. JB weld and a good polishing took care of them all. I wanted a more modern and accessible switch for the press while keeping the old functional switch on the motor. Using a flat rocker 20 amp light switch that newer houses use, with a thick plastic cover hinged with a hole drilled in it, gave it the design and look I wanted. It was mounted securely via the head bolt so no holes were drilled in the head. Switches like this for power tools are available on-line reasonably but I was under a time and cost crunch. A trip to the Re-Store got almost all of the electrical I needed including a twist lock quick disconnect (white) for the motor. The original delta lamp just needed new wiring. The Jacobs #34 drill chuck was old with a knurled sleeve and had a patent date of 1902. It was straight as an arrow and could grip 1/16” - 1/2” bits. It was fun to help someone start their first shop with their first power tool.

Photo 1:

Comments: Finished DP
Source: Restorer
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Photo 2:

Comments: As purchased
Source: Restorer
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Photo 3:

Comments: As purchased close up
Source: Restorer
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Photo 4:

Comments: Left side
Source: Restorer
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Photo 5:

Comments: Right side
Source: Restorer
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Photo 6:

Comments: Front Right close up
Source: Restorer
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