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Machinery Photo Index
Manufactured/Badged by:
Sears | Craftsman
*

True Manufacturer:
Parks Woodworking Machine Co., Cincinnati, OH.
Machine Specifications
Machine Class: Wood Working Machinery
Machine Type: Band Saw
Machine Size: 18" Wood
Submitted By: John Hough
Machine Specifications
Description/Model: 112.23770 Craftsman 100/Parks No. 2
Date of Manufacturer: mid to late 50s
Serial Number: 2-58
Last Updated 12/5/2018 8:13:12 PM

Comments:
Purchased at an estate auction the summer of 09, I stuffed this 6'3" monster into the back of a Grand Caravan along with an 8" Fay and Egan jointer. It was owned by a pattern maker who apparently had a thing for Delta machines. Since the purchase I've discovered (through OWWM) that the saw was designated the Craftsman '100' in the 1950 Sears power tool catalog with a list price of $194 ($1740 in 2009 dollars) without motor. Parks, the manufacturer, apparently referred to this model as 18" No. 2 Bandsaw with MW-2 being the metal working 2-speed version. It ran and cut well with a 3/8" blade, but wouldn't track a 1" blade so I replaced the old tires, had the lower wheel re-bored and trued, then fussed with wheel planer and alignment issues for about a month until I finally got it tracking nicely (understanding the adjustment possibilities for two piece construction was the hard part). Additionally, I was able to find parts (blade guides, the blade guard and sealed bearings) through the D.C. Morrison Co. in Kentucky so I replaced those as well. I considered upgrading the motor but the 1hp Delco runs very strong. The machine re-saws beautifully and hasn't bogged down no matter what I stuff through it. Another gloat alert; thanks to it's conflicted identity it sold for $80! I spent about $120 more for the tires, bearings, blade guard, and machinist services. I added the dust port making a plywood bracket so a commercial hose adapter could slide up for use and down for adjustments (in the down position in photo). I kind of like the current paint scheme and badge so I'll probably leave her conflicted. The HTC base was a later auction find at $20. Update - Two years later: I originally opted for the blue urethane tires because they promised to avoid the whole issue of gluing and crowning – something I’d never done before and looked complicated. Although the urethanes installed with relative ease, keeping them on the wheel, and more critically the blade on the tire, became a “challenge” – it got to the point where I was finding alternative ways to do work. So, the new rubber tires arrived last week and after following the installation instructions and studying the many methods of crowning I came up with a method that incorporates ideas found on the site but avoids the more complicated jigs. The process took about 45 minutes per tire and produced two evenly crowned tires. The method is posted on the .org site here: http://owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=101625 2018 update: Rubber tires rule - still going strong :-)

Photo 1:

Comments: A conflicted Craftsman/Parks 18" wood band saw. The saw has cast aluminum wheels, a change from the 1950 advertised cast iron. The blade guard is a replacement purchased from the D.C. Morrison Co. in Kentucky who still carries Parks parts. The Delta retir
Source: John Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
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IMG Code

Photo 2:

Comments: Motor cabinet. The upper frame is attached by 3 bolts (2 in the back & one inside the channel) allowing almost infinite adjustment across three axis. The wheel is cast aluminum and the tires are Carter 'Ultra Blue' urethane replacements.
Source: John Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
Direct Link
IMG Code

Photo 3:

Comments: Motor ID plate in a Craftsman/Parks 18" wood bandsaw. The motor is a repulsion-induction Delco 1hp wired for 220. It has a 203 frame motor so I believe it dates to the early/late 1950s.
Source: ohn Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
Direct Link
IMG Code

Photo 4:

Comments: Upper blade guides and thrust bearing. Note the blade insert - it feels and looks like lead.
Source: John Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
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IMG Code

Photo 5:

Comments: Lower blade guide and thrust bearing (not the same as the upper thrust bearing). I added the dust port which slides down for access.
Source: John Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
Direct Link
IMG Code

Photo 6:

Comments: Another shot of the guide/thrust bearing
Source: John Hough: Nikon Coolpix 51c
Direct Link
IMG Code