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Manufacturers Index - Trevor & Co.
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Patent Number Date Title Name City Description
11,858 Oct. 31, 1854 Shingle machine Harry H. Evarts Chicago, IL The patent was extended for seven years. A few years into the extension, "Application for Reissue, in two divisions, filed January 8, 1874." According to the "Decisions of the Commissioner of Patents" for 1874, the reissue was rejected. There is, however, an AI (Additional Improvements) patent, for making staves.
This patent was litigated in H. H. Evarts et al. vs. David M. Ford, in front of Judge J. Blodgett of the Northern District Court of Illinois, in November 1873. "The third claim of the patent granted H. H. Evarts, October 1, 1854, for improvement in shingle-machines, which is, 'presenting the sides of the fibers of the wood to the action of the saws in the sawing of shingles or equivalent articles, for the purpose of giving them smoother surfaces than can be produced by the usual mode of sawing,' if construed literally, asserts a right to a result, and cannot be sustained. Construed as a claim for the mechanism by which the result is effected, it may be sustained. A patent for a machine in which a shingle-bolt is fastened automatically by dogged teeth upon a rotating carriage, which presents it sidewise to the saw, is not infringed by a machine in which the bolt is by hand fastened to a reciprocating carriage, and by hand shoved to the saw and withdrawn. Evarts having failed to patent his hand-machine, made while experimenting and before taking out his patent on his perfected machine, and having failed to mention or describe it in the specification of the patent he did take out, is held to have abandoned it to the public. The opinion of the Commissioner of Patents, granting an extension, is entitled to great weight on the question of novelty."
Quoting from "Reports of Cases Arising Upon Letters Patent for Invention" by Samuel Sparks Fisher: "It is an ingenious and complete machine for sawing shingles from the block. A block, T (in the engraving represented in broken lines), is placed on each table, P, P'; is seized by dogs, actuated by H, and teeth t' and carried by the saws A, as the cogged rim F revolves. The tables P, P' are so inclined in respect to saws as to give the required taper to the shingle. The lever cams H are rocked on fulcrums in the rim D, by cams n', n', so that two at a time of the dogs i shall pierce the block as it arrives near the saw, or at T, by which time the other two dogs i, which hold the block thus far, are withdrawn; thus but two dogs, together with the teeth t', carry a block around. It must be observed that, to give the proper taper, the beds P, P' slope inward and downward from the saws the angle required. As the block always bears against this bed as it meets the saws, the taper necessarily results. The block is sawed alternately from end to end, giving the thin and thick ends of shingles, alternately from each end of the block. As soon as one shingle is cleared, it drops, and the dogs i, now holding the block, are withdrawn (by cams n', n'), and the block drops a distance equal to the thickness of the shingle just formed on the bed H, and is in the exact position to meet the next saw, just before clearing which, two dogs, i, quickly clamp it, and hold it until past this saw. Thus it may be seen that a block placed on one of the tables, and the machinery being in motion, the machine will convert it into shingles without further manual assistance."
19,033 Jan. 05, 1858 Shingle machine Robert Law Portage City, WI This patent date was seen on a Trevor shingle machine that also said, "Licensed under Evarts' Patent" and the date January 4, 1872 (patent 11,858). Shingles machines of this patent have even been seen in a 1912 catalog for Trevor Manufacturing Co., albeit with the improvements of patents 764,873 and 883,922. We have also see a Goldie & McCulloch shingle machine based on this patent, which was presumably not licensed since American patents were not recognized in Canada. We did find a listing for a Canadian shingle-machine patent granted in 1859 to one James Law of Scarborough, Ontario (932). We have not been able to find a copy of that specification but it might be a Canadian version of this patent: at the time, only residents of Canada could receive Canadian patents, so perhaps Robert Law arranged for a Canadian relative to apply for a patent on his behalf.
932 Mar. 24, 1859 Law's shingle and barrel heading sawing machine James Law ON, Canada It is possible that this patent is a duplicate of the 1858 US patent granted to Robert Law, 19,033. That patented shingle mill was manufactured for many years by Trevor & Co., of Lockport, NY, and for a few years by Goldie & McCulloch Co., of Galt, ON.
XC patents are Canadian patents issued between 1824 and 1869.
47,058 Mar. 28, 1865 Desk and Work Table Joseph Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY
106,014 Aug. 02, 1870 Improvement in stave-jointing machines William Widdowson Rochester, NY
166,041 Jul. 27, 1875 Machine for Making Barrel-Heads William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Munn & Co.- patent attorneys
The invention relates to machinery for circling barrel-heads by revolving clamps and a circular saw, the clamps being contrived to move the pieces to be sawed up to the saw, and turn them around one revolution, and then move away at the same time that they open to discharge the finished head; and it consists of the apparatus for gearing the shaft of the clamps with the saw-arbor to turn it thereby; also the apparatus for closing and opening the clamps; also mechanism for starting, stopping, and allowing the clamps to rest for changing the work; and also mechanism for causing the clamps to turn a little more than a revolution at each operation in combination with an automatic stop, to insure the cutting of the complete circle, all as hereinafter described.
Having thus described my invention, I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent—
1. The combination of a tripping-wheel, a, with the clamp-shaft and the trip-catch, the said wheel having slower motion than the clamp-shaft, substantially as specified.
2. The combination of the pinion, and tripping-wheel, with the driving-shaft, and the clamp-shaft, substantially as specified.
3. The swinging rod, combined with and jointed to the swinging clamp-shaft, substantially as specified.
4. The swinging rod, having lengthwise motion in its support, and the spring, in combination with the clamp-shaft, substantially as specified.
218,088 Jul. 29, 1879 Support for Steam-Radiators Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY R. F. Osgood - patent attorney
Our improvement relates to means for supporting steam-radiators, so that carpets can l>e readily laid beneath.
Heretofore the radiator has rested upon or in close contact with the floor, and in order to fit the carpet around it the carpet has had to be cut and turned under, thereby injuring the carpet, and making an unsightly enlargement around the radiator. To remedy this difficulty is the object of our invention; and it consists of a support constructed and arranged as hereinafter more fully described.
What we claim as new is—
1. The support A, for steam-radiators, consisting of the head a and horizontally-projecting arms b b, with the cleft or opening between them for receiving a carpet, as herein shown and described.
2. The support A, consisting of the head a and arms b b, provided on top with the lugs d d, to receive the flange at the base of the radiator, as herein shown and described.
    Support for Steam-Radiators Albert J. Evans Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
221,480 Nov. 11, 1879 Machine for Cutting Key-Seats William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY R. F. Osgood - patent attorney
My improvement relates to key seating or slotting machines, and is designed to do the work in a simpler and more effective manner than in ordinary machines for the purpose.
Having thus described my invention, I claim—
1. In a key seating or slotting machine, the combination of the fixed cotter F, the sliding head E, the adjusting-screws h h', the stiff bar G, attached to the sliding head, and the pivoted box Jj provided with a socket which receives the lower end of the bar, as shown and described, and for the purpose specified.
2. In a key seating or slotting machine, the. combination of the fixed cutter F, the sliding head E, the adjusting-screws h h', the stiff bar G, the pivoted box J, the pitman H, crank wheel I, and eccentric gears M M, as shown and described, and for the purpose specified.
3. In a key seating or slotting machine, the combination, with the sliding head E, guide bar G, and pivoted box J, of the adjusting screw, resting in a bearing, ff, and serving to gage the movement of the sliding head in cutting the slot, and the lever L, for pressing the cutter forward to its work, as herein shown and described.
4- In a key seating or slotting machine, the combination, with the sliding head E, guide bar G, and pivoted box J, of the gage-screws hh', as shown and described and for the purpose specified.
5. In a key seating or slotting machine, the combination, with the cotter P, of the lever L, pivoted to the cross-bar K, said lever being provided with/a thin edge, which extends down back of the cutter, the whole arranged as described, so that the operator, bearing upon the lever, can exert pressure upon the cutter, as , herein set forth.

221,479 Nov. 11, 1879 Junction Service-Boxes for Street Steam Mains William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY R. F. Osgood - patent attorney
Our improvement relates to street steam pipes laid in cities and towns for heating and other purposes; and it consists in an improved construction of the junction-boxes where the steam is taken from the main into service pipes, as hereinafter more fully described.
Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new is—
1. In a system of street steam-pipes, the combination, with the steam-main A, of the hollow chamber B, surrounding said main, with service-pipes C C opening from said chamber, the main communicating with said chamber by ports at the top or bottom, and valves situated within the chamber for controlling the steam, as described.
2. In. a system of street steam-pipes, the combination, with the main pipe A, of the chamber B, divided into compartments c c g, with ports b bf opening from the main pipe into said compartments, and ports h h opening from the lower into the upper compartments, said ports b b and h h being covered by valves i i and fc fr, as shown and described, and for the purpose specified.
3. In a system of street steam-pipes, the combination of the main pipe A, provided with ports b b and/at its top and bottom, the compartments c c g surrounding said main pipe, and provided with lateral service-pipes G C, and a system of valves, i i and ft fc, arranged in connection with ports b b and h h, to admit the steam from the main pipe to the service-pipes, either through the upper or lower compartments, as herein described.
4. In combination with a steam-main pipe, A A', the inclosing-chamber B, provided with lateral service-pipes C C, and arranged with a diaphragm having valves i Je, as shown and described, and for the purpose specified.

    Junction Service-Boxes for Street Steam Mains Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
451,228 Apr. 28, 1891 Machine for Splitting Wood William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to a wood-splitting machine, which is especially desirable for cutting blocks of wood into small pieces of the proper size to be fed to a grinding-mill for making wood pulp or other purposes. My invention has for its object to produce a simple and powerful machine whereby blocks of wood may be easily and rapidly split, and which can be operated with a comparatively small expenditure of power.
I claim as my invention—
1. The combination, with the stationary frame and the crank-shaft, of a guide or cross-head, a pitman operated by the crank-shaft and pivotally connected to the cross-head, and an ax or cutter attached to the pitman and receiving a vertical and lateral movement therefrom, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination, with the stationary frame and the crank-shaft, of a guide or cross-head, a pitman operated by the crank-shaft and pivotally connected at its lower portion to the cross-head, and an ax or cutter rigidly connected to the pitman, substantially as set forth.
3. The combination, with the stationary frame of the machine and the cross-head guided upon said frame, of a pitman pivoted at its lower portion to said cross-head and carrying a cutter, and a crank-shaft operating aid pitman and arranged out of center, whereby the cutter receives a nearly vertical movement in entering and a lateral or prying movement in finishing the cut and beginning the upstroke, substantially as set forth.
517,990 Apr. 10, 1894 Machine for Barking Logs William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that class of machines for removing the bark from logs intended for the manufacture of wood pulp, which consist of a vertical rotating cutter disk arranged in a case and provided on the front side of the disk with supports on which the logs are placed and rotated in contact with the cutters. The object of our invention is to improve the devices whereby the logs are presented to the cutter disk.
We claim as our invention—
1. The combination with the rotating cutter disk, of feed wheels and lifting arms arranged in front of the disk and made vertically movable with reference to each other, whereby either the feed wheels or the lifting arms can be made to support the log, at desire, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination with the rotating cutter disk, of feed wheels and vertically movable lifting arms arranged in front of the disk, and mechanism whereby the lifting arms can be raised above the feed wheels, substantially 95 as set forth.
3. The combination with the rotating cutter disk and its case, of feed wheels journaled in brackets secured to the case, lifting arms supported at their front ends by a rocking support, and mechanism whereby the rear ends of the lifting arms can be raised, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination with the rotating cutter disk and its case, of feed wheels mounted on shafts arranged across the face of the cutter disk, lifting arms composed of open frames through which said shafts pass, and mechanism whereby said frames and shafts can be raised and lowered relatively to each other, no substantially as set forth.
5. The combination with the rotating cutter disk and its case, of feed wheels arranged in front of the cutter disk, lifting arms capable of vertical movement, cams pivoted to the case and connected with said lifting arms, and a treadle whereby said cams are operated, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination with the rotating cutter disk and its case, of brackets secured to the front of said case, feed wheels mounted on shafts which are journaled in said brackets, a rock shaft journaled in said brackets, lifting arms secured with their front portions to said rock shaft, and a lifting mechanism connected with the rear ends of said lifting arms, substantially as set forth.

    Machine for Barking Logs Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
531,400 Dec. 25, 1894 Machine for Turning Barrel Heads William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to a machine which is employed for turning heads for barrels, tubs, &c., and in which the heading is presented by a revolving clamp to a concave circular saw. A machine of this character is shown and described in United States Letters Patent No. 166,041, granted to me July 27, 1875, and the present invention is an improvement upon the same. The object of my invention is provide means whereby the saw is carried quickly across the path of the heading blank so that the latter requires only one revolution in cutting the same.
I claim as my invention—
1. The combination with the movable heading clamp and the saw and its carriage, of an actuating device tending to move the saw carriage forwardly, a stop mechanism whereby the forward movement of the saw carriage is arrested before the saw has reached the cutting position and a trip device whereby the saw carriage is released when the heading too blank has reached the cutting position, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination with the heading clamp and ,the saw, both capable of movement toward and from the cutting position, of mechanism connecting the heading clamp with the saw carriage and retracting the saw carriage by the back ward movement of the clamp, an actuating device which tends to move the saw carriage to the cutting position, a stop mechanism whereby the forward movement of the saw carriage is arrested before it reaches the cutting position and a trip mechanism whereby the saw carriage is released and permitted to be moved forwardly when the clamp has moved the blank to the cutting position, substantially as set forth.
3. The combination with the main frame, the clamp frame pivoted on the main frame and the revolving heading clamp journaled on the clamp frame, of a saw having its axis arranged obliquely with reference to the axis of, the heading clamp, a sliding plate having a movement parallel with the axis of the heading clamp and adapted to carry the saw across the path of the heading blank, a rock shaft having an upper and a lower rock arm, a link connecting the upper rock arm with the sliding plate, a spring connected with the lower rock arm and adapted to move the saw into its operative position, and a retracting arm mounted on the clamp frame and adapted to engage with the lower rock arm for moving the saw into its inoperative position, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination with the clamp frame, the heading clamp mounted on said frame and the saw having a movement toward and from the heading clamp, of a spring whereby the saw is moved forward, a pawl whereby the forward movement of the saw is arrested and to a trip arm connected with the clamp frame and adapted to release the saw from the pawl, substantially as set forth.
5. The combination with the main frame, the clamp frame movably arranged in said main frame and the heading clamp mounted in said clamp frame of a sliding plate guided upon the main frame, and having a movement toward and from said clamp, a saw mounted upon said sliding plate, a ratchet connected with said sliding plate, a pawl engaging with said ratchet, and an arm attached to the clamp frame and engaging with said pawl, whereby the latter is released from said ratchet, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination with the main frame, the vertical rock shaft journaled in said frame, the clamp frame supported on said vertical shaft and the heading clamp arranged upon the clamp frame, of a sliding plate guided upon the main frame and having a movement toward and from the heading frame, a concave saw mounted on said sliding plate, a horizontal rock shaft journaled in the main frame and connected with the sliding plate, a ratchet wheel and a depending elbow lever secured to said horizontal rock shaft, a spring connecting said elbow lever with the mainframe, a pawl engaging with said ratchet wheel and provided with a trip arm, and a rock arm secured to the vertical rock shaft and engaging with the elbow lever and trip arm, substantially as set forth.

687,413 Nov. 26, 1901 Steam Boiler William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates more especially to low-pressure boilers which are used mainly for heating buildings by steam or hot water. The main object of our invention is to provide a large fire-space and large heating-surfaces without complicating the construction or greatly increasing the cost of manufacture: and to that end we associate with an upright boiler, which contains the fire-chamber, a secondary return-flue boiler in such manner that the hot products of combustion pass from the primary boiler through the return-flue boiler and escape from a smoke-box which is arranged between these boilers. Another object of our invention is to provide the smoke-box between the two boilers with means whereby the hot products of combustion can be made to pass directly from the primary upright boiler to the smoke-pipe when a direct draft is required—as, for instance, in starting the fire or for cleaning—or can be made to pass through the secondary boiler before reaching the smoke-pipe for fully absorbing the available heat in the gases when the boiler is working normally. A further object is to extend the fuel-magazine of the boiler downwardly and to surround the lower end of the magazine by a water-space for protecting the lower end of the magazine against excessive heat and for increasing the heating-surface.
We claim as our invention—
The combination of a primary upright boiler, a secondary return-flue boiler, an intermediate smoke-chamber secured to both boilers and provided with a horizontal diaphragm which divides the smoke-chamber into a lower and an upper compartment, a smoke-pipe on said upper compartment, the lower compartment connecting the smoke exit of the primary boiler with the direct flues of the secondary boiler and the upper compartment connecting the return-flues with the smoke-pipe, a direct-draft opening formed in said diaphragm, and a damper controlling said opening, substantially as set forth.
    Steam Boiler Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
696,119 Mar. 25, 1902 Sawing Machine William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that well-known class of sawing-machines which embody a circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage which is swung to and fro by the operator for carrying the bolt against the saw and back, and a gage which is arranged on one side of the bolt-carriage and against which the bolt is pressed by the operator before each cutting movement of the bolt-carriage for producing a uniform thickness of the cut slabs. The gage in these sawing-machines is adjustable toward and from the bolt-carriage for regulating the thickness of the cut. It is, however, often desirable to cut off a slab of greater thickness for the purpose of removing an imperfect portion of the bolt—for instance, a knot—and in other cases it is desirable to cut off slabs of less thickness than those for which the gage is set. The main object of this invention is to provide means for moving the gage quickly out of its normal position either from or toward the saw-carriage for taking a thicker or thinner cut than that for which the gage is set and returning the gage quickly to its normal position when such unusual cut has been taken. Another object of the invention is to provide simple means for regulating the distance through which the gage can be moved out of its normal position and the thickness of the unusual or emergency cut produced thereby.
We claim as our invention—
1. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movable bodily toward and from the bolt-carriage, mechanism for moving the gage out of a normal position with reference to the line of cut and the bolt-carriage and for returning the gage to this normal position, and means for stopping the return movement when the gage reaches said normal position, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movable bodily toward and from the bolt-carriage, means for moving the gage out of a normal position with reference, to the line of cut and the bolt-carriage, means for returning the gage, and a stop to limit said return movement, substantially as set forth.
3. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movable toward and from the bolt-carriage, a lever connected to said gage, a treadle connected to said lever for moving the gage in one direction, a spring for returning said gage, and a stop for limiting said return movement, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination of a saw, a-bolt-carriage, a gage movable bodily toward and from the latter, a stop for fixing the normal position of the gage with reference to the line of cut and the bolt-carriage, means for shifting the gage bodily to an abnormal position, a stop for fixing this abnormal position of the gage, and means for returning the gage to its normal position, substantially as set forth.
5. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a stationary frame, gage-frame mounted in said stationary frame to move bodily toward and from said carriage, gage members adjustably attached to said gage-frame, means for moving said gage-frame and the gage members carried thereby bodily in one direction, means for returning the gage-frame, and means for arresting the return movement of the gage-frame in the normal position of the latter, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a stationary frame, a gage provided with a horizontal rod which is capable of sliding in said stationary frame, a lever pivoted to said stationary frame, a link connecting the lever with said gage-frame, a treadle for moving said gage out of a normal position, a link connecting the treadle with said lever, means for returning said gage, and means for stopping, the return movement of the gage when said normal position is reached, substantially as set forth.
7. The combination with a stationary frame, a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage slidably mounted on said frame to move toward and from said carriage, a lever pivoted on said frame, a link connecting said lever and said gage, a treadle connected to said lever for moving said gage away from the carriage, means for returning said gage, a rod connected to said gage and passing through an opening in a part of said frame, and an adjusting-stop carried by said rod and adapted to engage said frame to limit the return movement of the gage, substantially as set forth.
8. The combination of a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movable bodily toward and from said bolt-carriage, means for moving the gage away from said carriage, an adjustable stop device for limiting the movement away from the carriage, means for returning the gage, and a stop for limiting said return movement, substantially as set forth.
9. The combination of stationary frame, a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movably mounted on said frame to move toward and from said bolt-carriage and provided with a stop, a regulating-wedge for determining the movement of said gage, said wedge being movable in the path of said stop, and means for holding said regulating-wedge in its adjusted position, substantially as set forth.
10. The combination of a stationary frame, a saw, a bolt-carriage, a gage movably mounted on said frame to move toward and from said bolt-carriage, a pivoted regulating-wedge for determining the movement of said gage, a stop carried by said gage, said wedge being arc-shaped and movable in the path of said stop, and means for holding said regulating-wedge in its adjusted position, substantially as set forth.

    Sawing Machine Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
741,854 Oct. 20, 1903 Machine for Removing Bark from Logs William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that class of machines for removing bark from logs intended for the manufacture of wood-pulp which comprises a vertical rotating cutter-disk arranged in a case, a support on the front side of the case on which the logs are placed and presented to the cutter through a suitable opening in the front of the case, and feed mechanism for pressing the logs toward the cutter and rotating them, so that all of the bark will be removed by the cutter. One object of the invention is to provide such a machine with a simple mechanism whereby the log-support can be readily adjusted vertically to hold logs of different diameters in proper position relative to the cutter. Another object of the invention is to provide an improved and simple feed mechanism for the logs.
We claim as our invention;
1. In a machine for removing bark from logs, the combination of a vertical cutter, a vertically-adjustable log-support, a horizontally-movable bar provided with stepped horizontal faces connected by inclined faces, and a lever connected to said bar for moving the same horizontally, whereby said inclined faces engage said log-support and lift the same from one horizontal face to the next, said horizontal faces acting to hold said log-support stationary at different elevations, substantially as set forth.
2. In a machine for removing bark from logs, the combination of a vertical cutter, a support for holding the log adjacent to said cutter, an elbow-shaped feed-frame pivoted at its inner end below said log-support, a spur feed-wheel carried by the outer end of said feed-frame, means for rotating said feed-wheel, and means for moving said feed-frame to cause the feed-wheel to engage the log on the upper portion thereof and press the log against said cutter and rotate the log on said log-support, substantially as set forth.
3. In a machine for removing bark from logs, the combination of a vertical cutter, a support for holding the log adjacent to said cutter, an elbow-shaped feed-frame pivoted at its inner end below said log-support, a spur feed-wheel carried by the outer end of said feed-frame, means for rotating said feed-wheel, a shield for said feed-wheel carried by said frame, and means for moving said feed-frame to cause the feed-wheel to engage the log on the upper portion thereof and press the log against said cutter and rotate the log on said log-support, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination with a rotary cutter disk and a log-support, of a feed-frame movable toward and from said cutter-disk, a feed device carried by said frame, a strap connected to said frame for moving the same toward the cutter-disk, a rotary part with which said strap frictionally engages, and which tends to move the feed-frame toward the cutter-disk, and means for driving said rotary part, substantially as set forth.
5. The combination with a rotary cutter-disk, and a log-support, of a feed-frame pivoted at its lower end to swing at its upper end toward and from said cutter-disk, a feed de- no vice carried by the upper end of said frame,a treadle, a strap connecting said treadle to said feed-frame, and a positively-rotated part between said feed-frame and said treadle over which said strap passes, and which tends to draw said strap in the direction in which it causes the feed-frame to swing toward the cutter, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination with a rotary cutter-disk and a log-support, of a feed-frame pivoted at its lower end to swing with its upper end toward and from the cutter-disk, a bearing-sleeve secured to the lower end of the feed-frame, a driving gear-wheel, a gear-wheel having an extended hub and mounted in front of said bearing-sleeve and driving gear-wheel, an intermediate gear-wheel connecting said gear-wheels, a treadle, and a strap connecting the treadle with the bearing-sleeve of the feed-frame and passing around said extended hub, substantially as set forth.
7. The combination with a rotary cutter-disk, and a log-support, of a feed-shaft arranged across said disk, a feed-frame pivoted at its lower end in line with said shaft, a feed-wheel arranged at the upper end of the feed-frame, driving mechanism connecting said feed-wheel with said shaft, a pinion provided with an extended hub and arranged in front of the lower portion of said feed-frame, means for driving said pinion from said feed-shaft, a treadle, and a strap connecting said treadle with the pivoted lower portion of said feed-frame and passing over said extended hub, substantially as set forth.
8. The combination with a rotary cutter-disk, and a log-support, of a transverse feed-shaft arranged in front of said cutter-disk, an elbow-shaped feed-frame pivoted on said feed-shaft, a pronged feed-wheel mounted in the upper end of said feed-frame so as to bear on the upper part of a log on said support and provided with a sprocket-wheel, a sprocket-wheel secured to said feed-shaft adjacent to the lower end of the feed-frame, and a drive chain connecting said sprocket-wheels, substantially as set forth.
9. The combination with a rotary cutter-disk, and a log-support, of a transverse feed-shaft arranged in front of the cutter-disk, an elbow-shaped feed-frame pivoted at its lower end on said feed-shaft, a pronged feed-wheel mounted in the upper end of said feed-frame and provided with a sprocket-wheel, a sprocket-wheel secured to the feed-shaft adjacent to the lower end of the feed-frame, a drive-chain connecting said sprocket-wheels, and guide-rollers for the drive-chain mounted on the feed-frame at the elbow bend thereof, substantially as set forth.

    Machine for Removing Bark from Logs Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
764,873 Jul. 12, 1904 Sawing Machine William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that well-known class of sawing-machines which embody a circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage which is provided with means for holding the bolt and which is swung to and fro by the operator for carrying the bolt against the saw and back, and a stationary bolt-gage which is arranged at one side of the bolt-carriage and against which the bolt is pressed by the operator before each movement of the carriage toward the saw to correctly gage the cut. In the operation of these sawing-machines, which are used largely for cutting barrel-headings, shingles, &c., the bolt is moved to the saw in a curved path concentric with the pivotal support for the bolt-carriage, and to secure the most efficient action of the machine the bolt should be supported by the carnage at such an elevation that the bolt strikes the saw first at the upper front edge of the bolt without, however, leaning so much toward the saw that the teeth of the latter will draw the bolt against the saw, because in the latter case the saw is liable to be broken unless the bolt splits under the action of the saw. Furthermore, the bolt should be supported at such a height that the mid-height of the back portion of the bolt moves in an arc passing through the axis of the saw, for in such a case the teeth of the saw will pass out of the bolt at about the middle of its rear side, and the saw will cut most nearly with the grain, and the cut from the-front to the rear side of the bolt will have the least width, whereby less power is expended and the cut is completed by the shortest possible movement of the bolt. Heretofore no provision has been made in sawing-machines of this class for maintaining this desirable relation of the bolt to the saw when operating upon bolts which were shorter than the standard length, and consequently short bolts are cut on such machines at an improper elevation and in an undesirable manner. When cutting very short bolts, an auxiliary grate or bottom has been placed upon the grate at the bottom of the carriage for supporting the short bolt; but this means for overcoming the difficulty is objectionable for several reasons, among them that the radius of the arc in which the bolt swings is thereby shortened and the operator is compelled to lift the carriage and bolt higher in order to clear the saw, thus increasing his labor. Furthermore, such an auxiliary support increases the weight of the carriage, cumbers the carriage with a part which is liable to be disarranged or broken by dropping the bolts on the same, and provides for only one change in elevation. The object of this invention is to render the pendulous bolt-carriage and its guide vertically adjustable to raise or lower the level of oscillation as the length of the bolt may require.
We claim as our invention—
1. The combination of a circular saw, an oscillatory bolt-carriage arranged to swing toward and from the saw, and means for adjusting the axis of oscillation of the carriage in the direction of a line drawn in front of the working side of the saw through the axis of oscillation and tangentially to a circle concentric with the saw, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination of a vertical circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage arranged in front of the saw and having its axis of oscillation above the same, and means for raising or lowering said axis, whereby the level or elevation of the oscillation of the carriage is correspondingly raised or lowered, substantially as set forth.
3. The combination of a circular saw, an oscillatory bolt-carriage arranged to swing toward and from the saw, means for adjusting the axis of oscillation of the carriage in the direction of a line drawn in front of the working side of the saw through the axis of oscillation and tangentially to a circle concentric with the saw, a segmental guide for the free end of the carriage, and means for adjusting said guide bodily to correspond with the adjustment of the axis of oscillation, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination of a vertical circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage arranged in no front of the saw and having its axis of oscillation above the same, means for raising or lowering said axis, whereby the level or elevation of the oscillation of the carriage is correspondingly raised or lowered, a segmental guide for the lower end of the carriage, and means for raising or lowering said guide at both ends to correspond with the adjustment of the carriage, substantially as set forth.
5. The combination of a frame having an upwardly-extending arm provided at its upper end with a vertical series of holes, a vertical circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage, a pivotal support on which said pendulous carriage swings toward and from said saw, means for securing said support in either of said holes in the frame-arm to raise and lower said bolt-carriage, a curved guide for the lower end of said carriage, and means for adjusting both ends of said guide up or down, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination of a frame, a circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage, means for adjusting the axis of oscillation vertically, a guide for the bolt-carriage, means for adjusting said guide vertically, and means for adjusting said guide toward and from the flat side of the saw, substantially as set forth.
7. The combination of a frame, a circular saw, a pendulous bolt-carriage, means for adjusting the axis of oscillation vertically, a guide for said bolt-carriage, a vertically adjustable supporting-bar for said guide, and a horizontal screw connecting said guide with said supporting bar for adjusting the guide toward and from the flat side of the saw, substantially as set forth.

    Sawing Machine Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY  
883,922 Apr. 07, 1908 Sawing Machine Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm, Parker & Hard - patent attorneys
This invention relates to improvements in wood sawing machines of that class having a pendulous bolt carriage in which the bolt or block to be sawed is suspended .and swung toward and from the vertically arranged circular saw, and a stationary bolt gage located at one side of the bolt carriage against which the bolt is pressed by the operator, before each forward or operative movement of the carriage, to correctly gage the thickness of the piece to be cut. This gage usually has two curved guides against which the bolt bears and slides in the forward movement of the bolt carriage. These machines are intended to saw bolts or blocks of different lengths and to secure the most efficient action of the machine the carriage should be adjusted vertically or the elevation of the bolt in the carriage so regulated that the saw will first enter the bolt near its upper end regardless of the length of the bolt. It has been found in the use of these machines that in order to prevent the bolt from tilting or assuming an inclined position when pressing it against the gage, it is necessary for the gage to be so situated as regards the bolt in the carriage, that one guide will be substantially the same distance above the vertical center of the bolt that the other guide is below such center. By this means, a firm and steady bearing surface is presented to the block, the resisting force of the guides being equally distributed both above and below the center of the block so that any tendency toward the tipping or inclination of the block is prevented. The object of this invention is to provide an adjusting means for the bolt gage and its guides which will be simple in construction and easy of operation and will enable the operator to readily adjust the gage and guides to any size of block which may be used. This is done by making the entire gage adjustable vertically so that the center of the gage can be located substantially opposite the center of the block to be sawed and by providing means for the independent vertical adjustment of the curved guides against which the block or. bolt bears m order to secure these guides in a position where they will be at corresponding distances above and below the center of the block or bolt. Where the blocks to be sawed are very long, it, is not necessary that the guides 60 should be so situated as to engage the end portion of the block but the ends may project above and below the guides, provided the guides are at corresponding distances above and below the center of the block. In such cases, however, the guides should be placed at some distance from the center to prevent the tipping of the block.

899,356 Sep. 22, 1908 Machine for Shaping Oar Blades William W. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm, Parker & Hard - patent attorneys
This invention relates to wood working machines more particularly intended for shaping or forming the blades of boat oars. The machine is, however, adapted by proper adjustments thereof and the employment of suitable pattern guides, for the production of other articles of analogous shape. The blade of an oar ordinarily tapers or decreases in width from its outer end to its juncture with the loom or stem while it decreases in thickness from the loom to the wide outer or tip end. The machine forming the subject of this application is for giving this general shape to the blades, by successive cuts forming three flat faces or surfaces on each side of the blade. The central faces at opposite sides are parallel in a direction crosswise of the blade, while the other faces converge from the central faces toward the edges of the blade. After the blade is thus shaped it is finished by hand or by other suitable means. The carriage in the machine described is intended to be reciprocated by hand, but it could be reciprocated mechanically if desired.
I claim as my invention:
1. The combination of a driven cutter arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate in a straight line past the cutter, devices on the carriage which hold the blank obliquely to the direction of movement of the carriage and which are rotatable to turn the blank about its axis, one of said holding devices embracing the blank between the ends thereof, a pattern past which the carriage moves, and a guide device which is connected to the blank holding means and is held against said pattern to regulate the turning of the blank as the carriage is advanced, substantially as set forth.
2. The combination of a driven cutter arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate in a plane parallel with the plane of the cutting edge of the cutter, devices on the carriage which hold the blank obliquely to the direction of movement of the carriage and which are rotatable to turn the blank axially and are adjustable to change the obliquity of the blank, one of no said holding devices embracing the blank between the ends thereof, a relatively stationary pattern, and a guide device which is connected to the blank-holding means and is held against said pattern as the carriage advances to regulate the turning of the blank, substantially as set forth.
3. The combination of a saw arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate in a plane parallel with the cutting plane of the saw, holding devices for the blank which are angularly adjustable on the carriage to regulate the obliquity of the blank to the direction of movement of the carriage and are freely rotatable to turn the blank about its axis, a pattern past which the carriage moves, an operating handle for the carriage secured to one of said holding devices, and a guide device which is connected to said holding device and is caused no to bear against said pattern as the carriage advances by hand pressure on said handle, substantially as set forth.
4. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past the cutter, means for holding the blank on the carriage and for turning the blank about its axis, two oppositely disposed patterns past which the carriage moves, and a guide device which is connected to the blank - holding means and is held against one of said patterns to regulate the turning of the blank in one direction and is held against the other pattern to regulate the turning of the blank in the opposite direction, substantially as set forth.
5. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past the cutter, means for holding the blank on the carriage and for turning the blank about its axis to present different portions thereof to the cutter, a pattern past which the carriage moves, and two devices projecting from said blank-holding means, each of which devices serves as a handle for holding the other against said pattern to guide the blank, one device acting as the guide in one position of the blank and the other acting as the guide in another position of the blank, substantially as set forth.
6. The combination of a saw arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past the saw, blank holding devices on said carriage which are rotatable for turning the blank about its axis, one of said devices being adjustable laterally toward and from the plane of the saw and both of said devices being angularly adjustable to align them in different lateral adjustments of the first mentioned device whereby the blank can be held in different positions obliquely to the direction of movement of the carriage, a pattern plate past which the carriage moves, and a guide which is connected to one of said holding devices and is held against said pattern plate, substantially as set forth.
7. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past said cutter and also to swing toward and from the plane of the cutter, holding devices for the blank which are angularly adjustable, and one of which holding devices is also adjustable toward and from the plane of the cutter, said holding devices being also constructed to turn the blank about its axis, and guide means for said blank, substantially as set forth.
8. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past, the cutter and also to swing toward and from the plane of the cutter, holding devices for the blank which are angularly adjustable on the carriage and one of which is adjustable toward and from the plane of the cutter, said holding devices being also rotatable to turn the blank about its axis, a guide device secured to one of said holding devices, and a pattern plate against which said guide device bears as the carriage is advanced, substantially as set forth.
9. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past said cutter and having grooved supporting wheels, a track having a rounded face on which said carriage wheels travel whereby the carriage is adapted to swing toward and from the cutter, means for guiding said carriage, and means for guiding the blank in the advance movement of the carriage, substantially as set forth.
10. The combination of a driven cutter, a carriage consisting of upright end posts, and horizontal bars adjustably connecting said end posts, supporting rollers for said carriage, a track on which said rollers travel, for adjusting the upper portion of one of said end posts toward and from the plane of said cutter, holding devices for the blank which are angularly adjustable on said carriage, and guide means for said carriage, substantially as set forth.
11. The combination of a driven cutter arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage for holding the blank arranged to reciprocate lengthwise of the blank past said cutter, a holding device for the blade end of the blank, and a hollow chuck for holding the loom, clamping devices carried by said chuck and which are movable to grasp and release the loom, and means for turning said chuck, a pattern past which the carriage travels, and a guide secured to said chuck and bearing against said pattern to regulate the turning of said blank, substantially as set forth.
12. The combination of a driven cutter arranged in a relatively fixed location, a carriage for holding the blank arranged to reciprocate lengthwise of the blank past said cutter, a holding device for the blade end of the blank, and a chuck for holding the loom comprising a rotatable open sided shell, clamping devices for the loom carried by said shell, and an open-sided support in which said shell is mounted to rotate, said holding device and said chuck support being angularly adjustable to hold the blank obliquely to the line of movement of the carriage, substantially as set forth.
13. The combination of a saw arranged in relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past the saw, means for rotatably holding the blank on the carriage, guide means for turning the blank as it passes the saw, a driven edge cutter, a pattern on the carriage, and means cooperating with said pattern to guide said edge cutter, substantially as set forth.
14. The combination of a saw arranged in relatively fixed location, a carriage arranged to reciprocate past the saw, means for rotatably holding the blank on the carriage, guide means for turning the blank as it passes the saw, a movable driven edge cutter, a pattern on the carriage, means cooperating with said pattern to guide said edge cutter, and means for normally holding said edge cutter out of action, substantially as set forth.

939,760 Nov. 09, 1909 Sawing Machine Francis N. Trevor Lockport, Niagara County, NY Wilhelm, Parker & Hard - patent attorneys
This invention relates more particularly to improvements in wood sawing machines of that class having a pendulous carriage in which the bolt or block to be sawed is held and swung toward and from a vertically arranged circular saw. In these machines a gage is located at one side of the bolt carriage and the bolt is released and moved by the sawyer against the gage to properly gage the thickness of the pieces to be cut prior to each advance movement of the carriage toward the saw. The gage is adjustable toward and from the plane of the saw for regulating the thickness of the pieces which are sawed from the bolt. It is quite often desirable to be able to cut a slab or piece of less thickness than those for which the gage is set, to saw the bolt to the best advantage, or for removing an imperfect portion of the bolt to avoid a knot or knurl in the wood, and for this purpose the present machine is provided with means for quickly shifting the gage whenever desired to a position for sawing such thin piece or pieces and returning it to the normal position. These machines are used for sawing barrel heading, or other slabs or pieces of uniform thickness, and shingles or pieces of wedge shape, and the gage is adapted to be secured in a vertical position for sawing the barrel heading and similar pieces, and to be tilted alternately in opposite directions on a central axis for sawing the shingles and the like. The primary object of this invention is to provide an efficient mechanism of simple, strong, inexpensive and durable construction for quickly shifting the gage from and returning it to the normal position in which it is set for sawing pieces of like thickness.

1,647,980 Nov. 08, 1927 Machine for operating on barrels or other containers William W. Trevor Lockport, NY
    Machine for operating on barrels or other containers Delbert A. Berean Barker, NY  
1,648,372 Nov. 08, 1927 Machine for operating on barrels and the like Delbert A. Berean Barker, NY "This invention relates to improvements in hoop driving and barrel leveling machines, and more particularly to machines used for driving the usual temporary heavy trussing hoops on trussed barrels..."
    Machine for operating on barrels and the like William W. Trevor Lockport, NY