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Manufacturers Index - Morgan Machine Co. Inc.
History
Last Modified: Jul 9 2017 12:01PM by Jeff_Joslin
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From the 1934 book, "A Century of Commerce in Rochester, NY"

Founded in 1894 as the Machinery Construction Co. Their specialty was box-making machines, including lock-corner machines and nailing machines. By 1899 the firm had changed its name to Morgan Machine Co. and was located at 46-48 Platt Street in Rochester, NY. Within a few years the company was in new premises at 1230 University Ave., where they remained until the business was wound down in 1975.

The titular Morgan was Henry W. Morgan, who, from 1897 through 1932, received numerous patents for his machines. As of 1899 the officers were C. M. Loring, president; H. W. Morgan, vice-president and general manager; C. W. Buswell, secretary and treasurer; and Clarence A. Macy, superintendent.

Morgan Gage Co. says on their web site that they provide parts and service for Morgan nailers.

Information Sources

  • The January 1895 issue of The Wood-Worker contains an ad for Machinery Construction Co. of Rochester, NY: "A box made on the Morgan lock corner box machines is stronger and cheaper than a nailed box. OUR NEW POWER-FEED BOX BOARD MATCHER. Beats the World."
  • Used machines listed in 1917 catalog.
  • 1919-1920 ads in The Wood-Worker.
  • Listed in 1955-56 Hitchcock's Wood Worker's Digest Directory.
  • Morgan Machine Co. was registered with the State of New York on 3 December 1925. This probably represents their date of incorporation.
  • Corporation Wiki has this listing -Morgan Machine Company, Inc. is located at 1230 University Ave Rochester, NY 14607. The officers include Hamilin, Marian M., Bailey, Thomas C., Hamlin, Henry P, Hamlin, Henry M. Morgan Machine Company, Inc. was incorporated on Tuesday, October 17, 1967 in the State of FL and is currently not active. Logue, Dayton represents Morgan Machine Company, Inc. as their registered agent
  • Email communication from former Morgan employee Harley Dixon.

    At the time I was there, from 1969-1972 they were located in their original building on University Avenue in Rochester (a building, that I was told, won an award in the early 1900s for efficient design. It had skylights in the roof for excellent natural lighting, and a traveling crane that covered every inch of the assembly, machining and shipping areas of the building. It also had a railroad siding at the back door for shipping and receiving the large machines and parts), situated not far from the more famous Gleason Works. Many of their large castings were done at Gleason's foundry. At that time, they were concentrating on basically just two types of new machines...pallet nailers, and manufactured home construction machines. Although, when in the field, I encountered many of their earlier models that needed some repair or maintenance to keep them working.

    The pallet nailers could be as simple as manually operated machines that required pushing by two operators to align each stringer with the stops under the multiple nailing heads, and then hand placing the deckboards before cycling the machine, to fully automated, unmanned systems that fed, nailed, flipped and stacked the pallets, just requiring someone to keep the hoppers filled with wood and nails and take away the finished stacks.

    The engineering and sales groups traveled all over the world to install and service the machines.

    The manufactured home building machines (as far as I know, there were only three of them) constructed the walls laying down, nailing the studs, applying sheathing and cutting doors and windows as required. It was one of the first machines that used a very early computer program to define the settings to set up the mainly relay operated system.

    The company went out of business around 1975, when the owner retired and shut it down. I was offered the Service Manager's position just before that time, but I struck out on my own instead.