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Manufacturers Index - Olin Gas Engine Co.
Patents
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Patent Number Date Title Name City Description
426,511 Apr. 29, 1890 Steam Pump and Motor Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Michael J. & William O. Stark - patent attorneys
The operation of this steam pump and motor is substantially as follows: Assuming the parts to be in the position shown in Fig. 2; that is to say, all the valves closed and the steam-piston at its apex and at the moment of commencing its down-stroke. The beam R has up to this point traveled a distance equal to the length of the slot-hole in the valve-rod r, so that as soon as the steam-piston starts on its down-stroke the puppet-valve S (being the exhaust-valve) opens and allows the steam to escape into the suction-chamber U, which, it is assumed, is filled, or at least partly filled, with water either from priming it or from the action of the pump, where said steam will be immediately condensed, and thereby cause the down-stroke of the steam-piston by atmospheric pressure, and at the same time assist in drawing water into the suction-chamber through the suction-pipe E', This pump-piston acts both as a sucker for the water to be raised and as an air-pump for the condenser, it drawing from the suction-chamber TJ, and thereby drawing with the water also the air and other products resulting from the condensation of the steam. The suction-valve chamber Y is carried down nearly to the bottom of the suction-chamber TJ, so as to draw therefrom as much as possible of the water and air contained therein. This is quite an essential feature to secure regularity in the action of the pump, which would not be so readily attained were the suction-chamber kept more or less full of the water of condensation. Owing to the partial vacuum in the suction-chamber during the down-stroke of the pump-piston, when water is being forced, water will be drawn into the suction-chamber through the suction-pipe E' during that stroke, so that as soon as the steam-cylinder exhausts its steam, will immediately come in contact with the fresh and cold water in said suction-chamber. When the steam-piston has nearly completed its down-stroke, the puppet-valve S will seat, while the rod i, connected with the puppet-valve I, will have moved the length of the slot-hole i', so that as soon as steam-piston. 0 has completed its down-stroke and just begins its upstroke, said puppet-valve I will open and allow steam to enter the steam-cylinder by the passage v, which also forms the exhaust-passage for the steam after the completion of the upstroke. A repetition of the operations heretofore described causes the continuation of the operation of the machine, a fly-wheel Q, having a band-wheel Q', assisting in carrying the cranks over their dead-centers. It will now be observed that the water-pump by the pump-piston forms the medium to condense the steam used in the steam-cylinder. Should it be required to use high-pressure steam in the steam-cylinder to lift water from a certain height, I shall regulate the length of the slot i' in the valve-rod i, so that the puppet-valve I will close early in the upstroke of the steam-piston, and thereby allow of an expansion of the steam sufficiently, so that when the upstroke is completed the initial steam-pressure shall have been reduced to a comparatively low one, and so that this steam will be readily condensed by the water in the. suction-chamber TJ without raising its temperature to any great extent, although steam at a high pressure will be condensed by said water if necessary. To use the steam-pump as a motor or engine only, the suction-pipe E' must be closed by a valve, (not shown,) and the discharge-pipe closed by shutting the stop-valve 2 and by opening the stop-valve 1, the pipe G of which should be connected with a sewer, reservoir, or other suitable receiver for the water of condensation, resulting from the operation of the engine, and which is not intended to be forced into the receptacle into which the pump when in use will deliver its water, and then the stop-valve Y' opened to discharge into the suction-chamber TJ, with water which will now come from the said reservoir into which the pump delivers its water or which might be supplied from a street-main or other suitable source. If steam is now given to the steam-cylinder, the operation of the steam-piston and its accessories will be the same as heretofore described; but its exhaust-steam will now be condensed by the sprays of water issuing from the perforated pipe Y, and removed from the suction-chamber by the pump acting in this case as the air-pump only. It will thus be seen that the change from a steam-pump to a steam-engine is one that can be made in a few moments of time, so that this machine is admirably adapted for farm and similar purposes, where it will only for a short time be used as a pump and may then be run as a motor. One of the advantages of constructing the pump and motor as described is, that the condensed water always carrying with it a to certain portion of air, the air in the air-chamber will constantly be replenished, it being a fact that in water-pumps having air-chambers the air is frequently forced out of said chambers, and then fails to properly perform its predesigned function. So does the suction-chamber act as an air chamber for the suction-pipe, for the reason that it will never fill entirely with water when the engine is running even at a slow speed.

443,107 Dec. 23, 1890 Balanced Govenor Valve Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Michael J. & William O. Stark - patent attorneys
This invention has general reference to improvements on a balanced valve.
525,358 Sep. 04, 1894 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Dunkirk, NY Miller & Hoddick - patent attorneys
My invention relates more particularly to that class of gas engine in which the motive power is obtained by the expansive action of ignited gases in which the ignition is automatically produced by electricity. The object of my invention is to produce an engine of the above class in which its speed is automatically regulated, the uniformity of its stroke properly governed, the point of ignition of the gas so placed, and method of affecting it so arranged as to obtain improved results, its lubrication rendered easy and efficient and its parts so arranged as to be convenient of access and compact in form.
569,564 Oct. 13, 1896 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that class of engines in which the power is derived by the rapid combustion of fuel in a cylinder containing a piston. One of the objects of my invention is to provide an engine of this character in which the different parts forming the explosive mixture are not commingled until they reach the firing-space, in which the expansion of the fuel charge when exploded is about twice that of its compression, and in which a working impulse may be obtained during each revolution of the crank-shaft. My invention has the further object to improve the construction of the piston-valve, to improve the means for operating the exhaust-valve, to provide a reliable mechanism for regulating the supply of fuel, to produce an economical and positive electric igniter, and to simplify and improve the machine in other respects.
569,386 Oct. 13, 1896 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Leggitt & Leggitt - patent attorneys
Application renewed 13 Mar 1896.
My invention relates to improvements in gas-engines, and more especially to that class of gas-engines wherein the expansive force of the gas acts directly upon the piston and through the piston upon the other moving parts, and wherein gas is introduced at one induction-port and atmospheric air at another induction-port to commingle with the gas, and wherein the mixed fluids are ignited or exploded by an electric spark, the resulting combustion or dilatation of the gases furnishing the desired motive power. My invention consists especially in the means employed for producing the electric spark to explode the gases; in the means cmployed for governing the speed of the engine; in the means employed for operating the eduction-valve, and in the means employed for lubricating the connection of the piston rod with the piston and engine-shaft. My invention also consists in certain features of construction and in combination of parts hereinafter described, and pointed out in the claims, the object being to produce an engine that is not only more economical and simple in construction, but that is more reliable, durable, and efficient than the gas engines heretofore devised.
571,495 Nov. 17, 1896 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to that class of gas engines in which a working impulse may be produced during every alternate forward stroke of the piston. My invention has the object to improve the valve mechanism whereby the fuel supply and the exhaust are controlled, to provide a simple and reliable means for governing the speed of the engine, and to simplify and improve the mechanism for operating the electric igniter.
571,498 Nov. 17, 1896 Gas Engine Emil Rappe Chicago, IL Charles G. Page - patent attorney
My invention relates to gas-engines of the "Otto" or four-stroke cycle type, that is to say, engines in which four strokes are required for each working stroke. Prominent objects of my invention are to simplify the construction and at the same time provide a method of governing which in steadiness of running serves to bring the efficiency of the engine up to a standard attained by the automatic-cut-off steam-engine. To the attainment of the foregoing and other useful ends my invention consists in matters hereinafter set forth. In a gas-engine characterized by my invention the exhaust-port is opened and closed by an exhaust-valve, which is made hollow, so as to provide a supply-passage which communicates with a supply-port. The supply passage, through the exhaust-valve, is opened and closed by a supply-valve which seats upon the exhaust-valve, so that while the supply-valve can be opened independently of the exhaust-valve both valves will be raised when the exhaust-valve is opened, and at the same time the supply-passage will be closed by the supply-valve. The supply-valve is at proper moments opened from a cut-off cam which is subject to an automatic governor on the fly-wheel, and the exhaust-valve is at proper times opened from an intermittently rotating cam. The speed of the engine determines the moment at which the supply valve is closed, this regulation being due to the adjustment of the cut-off cam by the governor. The cam from which the exhaust valve is opened is operated from a pawl-and-ratchet device, which is in turn operated from an eccentric in the main shaft, the pawl-and-ratchet device and said cam being timed with relation to the action of the piston, so as to operate and open the exhaust-valve at proper moments. Said pawl-and-ratchet device also controls and operates another cam or stop device which, at times when it is necessary to keep the supply-valve closed, acts in a way to temporarily break connection between the supply-valve and cut-off cam, so that regardless of the operation of the cut-off cam the supply-valve will remain closed.
592,881 Nov. 02, 1897 Igniter for Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates to an electric igniter for gas, petroleum, and similar engines, and has for its object to produce an igniter for this purpose which is simple and reliable in operation and which insures the production of an effective spark regardless of the speed of the engine.
613,390 Nov. 01, 1898 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Wilhelm & Bonner - patent attorneys
This invention relates more especially to that class of gas-engines in which a working stroke of the piston may be produced during every alternate forward movement of the piston. The objects of this invention are to improve the construction of the valves and the mechanism for operating the same, to provide a simple governor for regulating the speed of the engine, and to provide a reliable electric igniter for exploding the charges of fuel.
653,876 Jul. 17, 1900 Gas Engine Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY
734,595 Jul. 28, 1903 Crank and Yoke Connection Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY
835,634 Nov. 13, 1906 Valve for Gas and Similar Engines Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY
873,108 Dec. 10, 1907 Electric Lamp Holder Charles E. Throop Buffalo, NY
    Electric Lamp Holder Samuel A. Freeman Buffalo, NY  
908,605 Jan. 05, 1909 Crank and Yoke Connection Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Geyer & Popp - patent attorneys
This invention relates to a crank and yoke connection and has the objects to provide a rolling bearing of improved construction which relieves the friction between the slide and guide bars; to provide improved means for taking up the wear or slack between these parts and to improve the means foils connecting the guide bar and the tie bars of the yoke.

984,439 Feb. 14, 1911 Governor for Gas Engines Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY
1,366,413 Jan. 25, 1921 Tractor Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY Geyer & Popp - patent attorneys
This invention relates to a tractor or traction engine for hauling heavy loads over rough ground and more particularly to tractors in which a driving endless-belt tread is employed.

1,423,962 Jul. 25, 1922 Tractor Fred C. Olin Buffalo, NY