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Manufacturers Index - Atlas Engine Works

Atlas Engine Works
Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A.
Manufacturer Class: Wood Working Machinery & Steam and Gas Engines

Patents
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Patent Number Date Title Name City Description
220,612 Oct. 14, 1879 Road Engine Willard T. Hatch Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
I have devised an improved arrangement of the parts for transmitting power from the engine to the driving-wheels. I use a single engine, with the obvious economy of construction and repair and the diminished friction due to such, and have connected an efficient device f for starting the engine when it is stopped on the center.

Claims:
1. In a portable and traction engine having a chain, D, for communicating power to the bearing-wheels W, the shaft I, turning on a fixed center, and the shaft H, turning on a movable center, in combination with means, C C, for adjusting the position of the latter in a path concentric to I.

2. In a portable engine having a single cylinder, the friction-piece R, rod Q, lever P, and connection N, adapted to serve as herein specified.
271,729 Feb. 06, 1883 Oscillating Valve Matthew R. Moore Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
This invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, which forms a part of this specification, and in which the figure represents a section through the center of the valves, cylinder, and head, showing the relation of the valves to said cylinder and head and to each other. It also shows the forms and relations of the parts adjacent to the valves, the seat of the steam-valve being entirely within the cylinder, and no part thereof being recessed into the head, and the seat of the exhaust-valve being in the cylinder so far as the bearing-surface is concerned, but a large part of the cavity being recessed in the head of the cylinder. The valves are inserted and removed by an endwise movement.

Claims:
1. In a steam or gas engine, the oscillating steam-valve D, working in a circular cavity, and having its seat formed entirely within the cylinder, and always open for the access of steam, and having also gridiron bars and passages, as shown, combined with corresponding gridiron bars and passages in the cylinder, and the steam-inlet passage formed in the cylinder-head, as set forth.

2. The exhaust-valve described, having its seat formed in the cylinder and its recess or cavity formed largely in the cylinder-head, the said valve being always open to the cylinder for the exit of water of condensation and exhaust, but having gridiron bars and passages to correspond with the ports in the cylinder, as set forth.

3. In a steam-engine, and in combination with a cylinder in which the inlet k and exhaust-passages k', are formed entirely in the cylinder head and in line with the travel of the piston, the inlet-valve having its recess and seat formed entirely within the cylinder always open for the access of steam, and having bars and passages to correspond with similar bars and passages in the cylinder, and the exhaust-valve always open to the cylinder, but having bars and passages, as shown, the said valve having its seat in the cylinder and its recess largely in the cylinder-head, as and for the purposes set forth.
362,525 May. 10, 1887 Balanced Slide Valve Matthew Robert Moore Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
I have attained all that is desirable in an equilibrium-valve Without introducing any new defects or materially increasing the cost of manufacture of the valve or of the engine to which it is to be applied.

My balanced valve is peculiarly adapted for ready compensation for wear, and does not require any peculiar adaptation of the cylinder or steam-chest, and hence can be applied to engines already in use.

There are two principal classes of balanced slide-valves: First, pressure-plate valves-flat slides in which the pressure of the steam is taken of the back of the valve by means of the steam-chest cover or some special rigid plate or hood introduced in the steam-chest for the purpose; and, second, piston valves, Where the valve, usually cylindrical for convenience of manufacture, but which may be theoretically of any shape, moves steam-tight in a casing, as a piston moves in a cylinder, and the steam, being forbidden access to its sides, and acting in opposite directions against its ends, causes a balance of pressures.

A common defect of valves of the first class is that they make no provision for balancing pressure from the cylinder due to steam already admitted, or to compression after exhaust closure, acting outward on the area of the valve which covers the port, and which varies in intensity from that of the exhaust up to or even above that in the boiler. They cannot lift off their seats to relieve pressure from such source, being held down by the pressure-plate or hood. Excessive pressure from this cause, due to water entrapped within the cylinder by the closing of the valve, is liable to cause destructive accident. Sometimes the pressure plate or hood is not fastened to the valve-seat, the object of leaving it loose being to allow it to rise with the valve and so relieve pressure from within; but the area of the back of the plate or hood is necessarily many times greater than the area of the port through which the internal pressure acts, so that it is practically immovable, and the provision for allowing it to rise fails to accomplish any good result. It simply renders the parts more liable to become displaced.

Valves of the second class-piston-valves have the ports extended quite around, so that any pressure from any source is certainly balanced g but to secure sufficient portage the valve must be made very large relatively to a flat slide of equal opening, involving increased friction, weight, wear, etc., and as the valve wears smaller While its casing wears larger it rapidly grows leaky and must be replaced.

Piston valves are peculiarly subject to objection in case of water in the cylinder. Such valves cannot possibly leave their seats.

I have combined the advantages of valves of the two classes-hooded slide-valves and piston-valves-and have eliminated their defects. While having the general form of a hooded Valve, my valve is really a piston valve, made in such shape as to secure large port opening Without excessive Weight, While the form is easy to refit in case of leakage from Wear. I combine with it a special provision for relieving back pressure.

Claims:
1. The flat cylinder-face A, balanced slide valve B, having flat faces and beveled edges, a corresponding hood, C, and an inclosing steam chest, allowing the steam to apply on the exterior of the hood, all combined and arranged to serve as herein specified.

2. The plane cylinder-face A, having ports, the hood C, having plane interior surfaces, beveled, as shown, and provided with grooves c, and also with ports for relief-openings through into the steam-chest, in combination with the flat valve B, having beveled edges, and with relief-valves E, all arranged for ljoint operation, as and for the purpose herein specified.
642,146 Jan. 30, 1900 Valve Gear Matthew Robert Moore Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
The improvement relates to the hook and the adjacent parts by which is effected the alternate connection and disconnection of the positive working mechanism with the arm of the valve-stem. I provide an improved construction for receiving the action of the hooks
to open the steam-valves. I enclose in a just sufficiently larger recess in the hook a soft-surfaced pin set in the operating part, which serves as a silent and efficient stop to restrain any excess of turning motion of the hook. I provide by the construction of the hook for performing the double function of a push-down and a means for further insuring the engagement of the hook.

Claims:
1. In a Corliss engine, having the valve stem B with its arm B', the combination therewith of the hook M, the pin B² having an extension B³ adapted to carry the two catch-plates B6 and securing means as the bolt B4 and nut B5 and the removable head B7 and securing means B8 therefor, all substantially as herein specified.

2. In a Corliss engine, having the positively rocking part D' carrying the soft-surfaced stop T on its face, the valve-stem B with its arm B', and the cam-ring P carrying the cams P² and P³ the combination therewith of the hook M arranged to be engaged by an outward movement of said hook and provided with the recess m larger than said stop and holding the same, adapted to allow the hook adapeted to allow the hook to swing but to limit its movement.
642,621 Feb. 06, 1900 Valve Gear for Engines Matthew Robert Moore Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
The valve-motion is intended to work with an ordinary single slide-valve proportioned for cutting off by the lap. An eccentric gives a smooth motion with no concussions; but when applied to such valve it opens and closes the passages for the induction and ed notion of the steam slowly. This occasions wire-drawing the obvious reduction of pressure of the steam in passing through a scantily-opened orifice in the early part of the opening motion and the last part of the closing motion. Such wire-drawing is a loss. Many efforts have been made to reduce it by providing liberal passages and opening and closing them rapidly and varying the point of cut-off to effect regulation. The present invention is an improvement in mechanism for attaining these ends.

The requirements for a perfect distribution of steam in the cylinder of a stationary engine are-first, at the beginning of each stroke of the piston the steam-port leading into the end of the cylinder behind the piston shall be amply opened to admit steam at as nearly as possible boiler-pressure, the port at the other end of the cylinder being at the same time fully opened to the exhaust-pipe to permit the free exit of the steam which has done work in the opposite stroke; second, these conditions to be maintained, so as to preserve the initial pressure, until the point of cut-off determined by the governor is reached; third, the admission -port to be closed sharply without arresting the exhaust from the opposite end of the cylinder; fourth, these last conditions to continue, allowing the steam to drive the piston by its elastic expansion, until near the end of the stroke; fifth, the exhaustion from the opposite end to be closed and the remaining exhaust-steam before the piston to be compressed (sometimes termed cushioned) to raise the pressure in the clearance-space and valve passage or passages, and, sixth, this to continue until just before the end of the stroke, when, seventh, the port to the first end of the cylinder is to be opened to the exhaust, so as to discharge from that end preparatory to the commencement of the return of the piston. The like succession of conditions will occur during the return stroke and will be repeated continuously While the engine is in operation, with the required changes in the position of the cut-off point to maintain uniform speed if the load or the steam -pressure varies. These requirements have been fairly Well met in engines having separate steam and exhaust valves for each end of the cylinder and have been approximated in single-slide valve engines having a separate cut-off valve but there are serious objections to such additional valve. To obtain such motion with simple mechanism and a single valve and which will allow of rapid revolutions without concussion and noise is the object of my invention.

Economical distribution of the steam can be effected by means of a properly-proportioned single valve alone by operating with a certain step-by-step motion which may be attained by a cam. The valve and valve-stem may be light, but the operating parts have necessarily much weight, and in ordinary valve-gears the action involves noise and concussions, so as to be seriously objectionable. I have discovered that it is practicable to give such motion by two cams, one fixed on the shaft and the other changeable, and two combined sets of parts operated thereby, with the changes of velocity divided between them, so that the full transitions from slow to rapid motion and back again, occurring during each stroke, shall be confined to the valve and valve-stem. The valve having a proper amount of lap moves rapidly at the several periods of opening and closing the passages and moves slowly at intermediate periods. The offsets in the cams are so gradual and the relatively heavy rollers, rods, and levers directly actuated thereby have so moderate changes of motion that the engine may serve at a high speed without concussion. The construction provides for rapidly changing the point of cutoff through a wide range, so that the action of the governor is peculiarly efficient. The combined levers make the valve move in the same direction as one cam and to twice the extent of motion, the motion being received through an arm which I term a rocker, doubled in extent by an additional part, the lever effect being what is sometimes termed a lever of the third order, while the portion of the motion of the valve due to the other cam is received through a further rocking motion of such additional part. This important part I term a rider. It is a lever of the second order, and in addition to its function of in creasing the effective length of the rocker receives and reverses the motion of the second cam without increasing it.

Claims:
1. In a steam-engine, a single slide-valve adapted to effect the distribution and exhaust from both ends of the cylinder and to cut off by the lap, the two cams I and K, contributing through connections including a rocker to give two quick motions in each stroke separated by a period of rest, the cam I and its rod J connected. to the rocker at a point nearer the center of motion than the valve connection, so that the arrangement multiplies the motion, all substantially as herein specified.

2. In a steam-engine, a single slide-valve adapted to effect the distribution and exhaust from both ends of the cylinder and to cut off by the lap, the two cams I and K, contributing through connections including a rocker and rider to give two quick motions in each stroke separated by a period of rest, the cam K and its rod L connected to an arm of the rocker of such length that while it is desired for the rider to be ineffective its end may coincide with the fixed center of the rocker, substantially as herein specified.

3. In valve-gear for steam-engines, a single slide-valve and ports proportioned for cutting off by the lap, the rocker G and the rider H pivoted thereon, the latter having widely divergent arms one of which is connected to the Valve, in combination with the cam I fast on the shaft, shaped for imparting a two-step reciprocating motion to the connected rocker and the loose governor controlled cam K shaped for imparting a single reciprocating motion to the connected rider and a fluid pressure cylinder and piston connected with the rider near the mid-length of the proper arm thereof, arranged to maintain a reliable but yielding contact of each rod with its cam, all substantially as herein specified.

4. In valve-gear for steam-engines, the rocker, a rider pivoted thereon and having widely-divergent arms one of which is connected to the valve, in combination with rods connected to the rocker and to the other arm of above set forth.
662,011 Nov. 20, 1900 Steam Engine Dash Pot Matthew Robert Moore Indianapolis, IN Abstract:
My improved dash-pot may be used with steam of any pressure; but it should be al1owed to have a large diameter if intended to be used with steam of very moderate pressure, because the active force to effect the shutting motion of the valve is derived from the direct action of the steam on the movable part, usually termed a piston, therein. I will show such piston as packed but it will be understood that packing is not essential.

In what I esteem the most complete form of the invention I employ two dash-pots and links for each of the steam valves. In one I let the steam flow freely through a liberal opening in the axial line of the piston and make the piston of two widely-differing diameters, arranging it to play to the considerable distance required to shut the valve in a corresponding cylinder of two diameters. The area which is effective is the annular excess of the larger over the smaller diameter. When my invention is thus carried out, the pressure of the steam on that annulus contributes to close the valve.

I mount the cylinder and piston in close connection with the valve, using a rolling valve, and I connect to the valve at a point near its mid-length, by which I mean near the mid-length of its axis. The link between the valve and the piston allows a very easy connection and disconnection for examination or repairs. I provide for catching and retaining or leading harmlessly away the small quantities of water or oil, or both, which are liable to be thrown out by the active movements of the air.

Claims:
1. In a steam-engine the combination with a cylinder mounted on the steam-chest, of a trunk dash-piston working therein and having a longitudinal steam-aperture and operating a suitable valve substantially as set forth.

2. In a steam-engine, the combination of a piston of two diameters, having a longitudinal steam-aperture and working in a corresponding cylinder, A' A2 mounted on the steam-chest and provided with apertures a2, arranged to be covered and uncovered by the movements of the piston, the latter operating a suitable valve, substantially as set forth.

3. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve mounted on a fiat rocking shaft with liberty to leave its seat and having a. lateral arm at right angles to the plane of the shaft within the valve chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and a connected piston subject to the steam-pressure operating through the link to turn the valve-arm in the direction to close the valve all arranged for joint operation substantially as herein specified.

4. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and a piston containing a longitudinal aperture directly communicating with the steam in the valve-chest said link transmitting motion between the valve and piston, substantially as set forth.

5. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link, pivoted to such arm and a piston containing` a longitudinal aperture directly communicating with the steam in the valve-chest, said piston having a simple rolling contact with the link thus permitting ready detachment when required all substantially as set forth.

(S. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having` a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm, a piston of two diameters, having a longitudinal steam-aperture and working in a corresponding cylinder A' A2 provided with apertures a2, arranged to be covered and uncovered by the turning of the valve, substantially as set forth.

7. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and connected piston subject to the steam pressure operating through the link to turn the valve-arm in the direction to close the valve, such piston being of two diameters working in a corresponding cylinder A' A2 provided with apertures d2 arranged to be covered and uncovered by the turning of the valve and the link having a simple rolling contact with the piston thus being free to be easily detached from the piston when required all substantially as set forth.

8. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and connected piston subject to the steam pressure operating through the link to turn the valve-arm in the direction to close the valve, such piston being of two diameters working in a corresponding cylinder A' A2 provided with apertures d2 arranged to be covered and uncovered by the turning of the valve and with a lip AX adapted to arrest any water and oil ejected through such apertures, all substantially as set forth.

9. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the Valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and a connected piston subject to the steam pressure operating through the link to turn the valve-arm in the direction to close the valve, such piston being of two diameters working in a corresponding cylinder A' A2 provided with apertures CL2 arranged to be covered and uncovered by the turning of the valve and with a lip AX and the pipe K adapted to arrest and lead away any Water and oil ejected through such apertures all combined and arranged to serve substantially as herein specified.

10. In a steam-engine, a rocking valve having a lateral arm within the valve-chest, in combination with a link pivoted to such arm and a connected piston subject to the steam pressure operating through the link to turn the valve-arm in the direction to close the valve and a second arm on the valve also within the valve-chest extending in the opposite direction from the first and having a connected link and piston arranged to contribute to turn the valve also into the closed position, the tendency of one piston being to crowd the valve upon its seat and of the other to balance such tendency by exerting a force tending to lift the valve off its seat, all combined and arranged for joint operation substantially as herein specified
929,000 Jul. 27, 1909 Governed Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
929,100 Jul. 27, 1909 Governed Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
929,101 Jul. 27, 1909 Governed Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
929,102 Jul. 27, 1909 Fuel Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
929,970 Aug. 03, 1909 Fuel Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
931,458 Aug. 17, 1909 Stopper Bartholomew J. Morrison Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
931,389 Aug. 17, 1909 Internal Combustion Engine George Louis Crook Indianapolis, Marion County, IN Atlas Engine Works was listed as Trustee for this patent.
933,325 Sep. 07, 1909 Fuel Feeder for Internal Combustion Engines Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
933,698 Sep. 07, 1909 Valve George Louis Crook Indianapolis, Marion County, IN Atlas Engine Works was listed as Trustee for this patent.
939,368 Nov. 09, 1909 Boiler Bracket William Withem Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
940,703 Nov. 23, 1909 Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
940,704 Nov. 23, 1909 Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
943,095 Dec. 14, 1909 Governed Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
943,987 Dec. 21, 1909 Governed Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
943,988 Dec. 21, 1909 Pump Norman McCarty Indianapolis, Marion County, IN