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Manufacturers Index - Stanley Works, Stanley Electric Tools

Stanley Works, Stanley Electric Tools
New Britain, CT, U.S.A.
Manufacturer Class: Wood Working Machinery

Patents
This page contains information on patents issued to this manufacturer.

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Patent Number Date Title Name City Description
29,760 Aug. 28, 1860 Hammer Reinhold Boeklen Brooklyn, NY The patent is for a magnetic tack hammer. The magnet could be a separate piece for one head, or the whole head; the specifications mention coating all but the ends of the head with non-conducting material. A known example is marked with this patent date in combination with the Dec. 10, 1867 date corresponding to Thomas Conklin's patent for a one-piece hollow handled hammer (pat. no 71,986). The Conklin patent was used in several tack hammers produced by Stanley.

Boeklen & G.W. Schramm received another hammer patent mentioning a magnetic tack face on Nov. 4, 1862 (Pat. no. 36829).
48,555 Jul. 04, 1865 Improvement in door-bolts William H. Hart New Britain, CT In "Stanley Works v. Sargent & Co., heard before Judge J. Shipman of the District of Connecticut Court in April 1871, The Stanley Works sued Sargent & Co. for infringing this patent. The defendants claimed that the idea was not patentable because it was not new, and produced several articles of various manufacture. But the judge found that all those door-bolts were considerably more complex in construction, and that Hart's design was novel and worthy of patent protection. An injunction was issued and the matter was referred to a master to determine damages.
71,986 Dec. 10, 1867 Improvement in the Manufacture of Tack Hammers Thomas A. Conklin New Britain, CT One piece casting with the handle hollowed with a large surface but with little material and coated to give it a rust proof surface. The casting is treated, "bit" with acid and then tinned or japanned.
Incorporated by Stanley as their No 4 Improved Tack Hammer, No 5 Saddler's Hammer, No 6 Tack Hammer and No 12 Tack Hammer.
A known example of the No 12 style is marked with just this patent & R. Boeklen's Aug. 28, 1860 magnetic head patent 29,760. John Walter indicates that the No 12 was not marked with the Stanley name.
79,175 Jun. 23, 1868 Square and Mitre William S. Winterbottom Philadelphia, PA The first in the Winterbottom triumvirate of try squares. An example was seen at a 2008 auction by Brown Auction Services. See patent 91,892 and patent 329,353.
RE3,308 Feb. 23, 1869 Improvement in Tack Hammers Thomas A. Conklin New Britain, CT Single piece casting with a hollowed handle and coated to prevent rust.
91,892 Jun. 29, 1869 Improvement in combined try-square and bevel Charles Winterbottom Philadelphia, PA The famous combined Try and Mitre Square that was eventually purchased and manufactured by the Stanley Rule & Level Co. See Winterbottom Brother's patent 79,175 and patent 329,353.
Frequently found without the Winterbottom stamp. Rare with the stamp. Usually found in 4 to 6 inch sizes. Larger sizes very rare. One 12 inch with rosewood version is known.
97,455 Nov. 30, 1869 Bit-stock Augustus Stanley New Britain, CT Manufactured by Stanley Rule & Level Co.?
103,281 May. 24, 1870 Bit-stock Harry S. Bartholomew Bristol, CT
125,858 Apr. 16, 1872 Improvement in Try-Squares Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT An improvement in the metal stock of the handle of a try-square in combination with a solid wood block which forms the outer surface of the handle. Basically an extended metal lip that is secured by one screw in the middle of a solid wood stock.
151,254 May. 26, 1874 Carpenters' Squares Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT The famous pewter filled metal framed try square stock. Typically fitted out with walnut infill.
186,348 Jan. 16, 1877 Improvement in machines for cutting pins, dowels, &c. Frank H. Kane Syracuse, NY
336,674 Feb. 23, 1886 Plane Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT
387,570 Aug. 07, 1888 Pocket Rule Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT A folding rule joint such that the rule can be locked in position to function either as a rule, try-square or bevel.
719,062 Jan. 27, 1903 Plane Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT
723,523 Mar. 24, 1903 Screw Driver or Kindred Tool Patrick H. Garrity Waterbury, CT The patent is for a solid shank extending through the handle of the tool, and with a broad broad square surface set flush with the end of the handle to allow the shank to be struck with a hammer without splitting the handle.
A screwdriver marked PAT 3/24/03 has a solid shank extending through the handle, but the end cap completely covers the end of the handle. The screwdriver also has a heavy hex collar attached to the shank below the handle ferule. The hex collar allows a wrench to be used for extra turning force.

Samples marked 'STANLEY,VICTOR,PAT.03-24-03 WOOD' and do not have hex collar.Stanley sold these screwdrivers under the Victor name in the 1905 #34 catalog.
766,491 Aug. 02, 1904 Plane Albert William Campbell , England Adjusting the cutting depth of the cutting iron at either throat of a double end block plane. According to the History of Stanley Rule & Level Co. written by James Burdick c. 1930, this patent was never used, but John Walter cites it being used on the Stanley No. 131 double end blockplane. This patent is very similar to one issued to Justus Traut the same day 766473 which was used for the No. 131 and likely causes the confusion. These patents are redesigns to the earlier patent by Traut 645220 for cutter adjustments to standard blockplanes.
772,211 Oct. 11, 1904 Bit gage Arthur D. Campbell Wilkes-Barre, PA
777,657 Dec. 20, 1904 Bit-brace jaws Joseph P. Bartholomew New Britain, CT
803,669 Nov. 07, 1905 Bit-brace Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT
813,586 Feb. 27, 1906 Ratchet mechanism for tools Hubert P. Richards New Britain, CT
822,714 Jun. 05, 1906 Ratchet mechanism for tools Joseph P. Bartholomew Bristol, CT
837,978 Dec. 11, 1906 Scraping-tool Justus A. Traut New Britain, CT
850,347 Apr. 16, 1907 Ratchet mechanism Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT
850,566 Apr. 16, 1907 Ratchet mechanism Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT
887,708 May. 12, 1908 Bit-brace handle Samuel H. Stearns New Britain, CT
913,340 Feb. 23, 1909 Percussively-operated hand-tool George E. Wood Plantsville, CT This patent is for the "Everlasting" handle, primarily used on chisels and screwdrivers. It was first produced by G. E. Wood Tool Co., which was bought out by Stanley Rule & Level.
"My invention relates to the class of hand tools having a blade and shank of metal, the shank being arranged to received a handle of wood or other fibrous material, and which tools, as for instance a chisel, are adapted in use to receive blows upon the handle end of the tool, and the object of the invention is to provide a tool of the kind specified having numerous novel features of advantage and utility."This Patent relates to tools that are struck repeatedly on the handle,Chisels , screwdrivers ,etc.By using a solid steel shank the wood handle is protected.This Patent and four others,894303, 808330, 932223, 924210 all relate to this processes and were all patented while George E. Wood was employed by The Stanley Rule and Level Co.as the superintendent of screwdrivers.He had held that position since 1904 when Stanley purchased the HurWood screwdriver company.As late as 1908 there is a listing for the G.E.Wood Tool Co. in Plantsville CT.,though by 1912 this company is listed as a department of The Stanley Rule and Level. This Patent is certainly a precursor of the 'Everlasting Chisel', that Stanley introduced in a 1911 catalog.An example of a G.E. WOOD TOOL Co. Everlasting style wood chisel, marked 'G.E.Wood Tool Co.'with four Patent dates,Dec.26. 05.,July 28. 08.,Feb. 23. 09.,Aug.24. 09.
Also see Patents 1139392, 1198609, 1493176, 1553794, for Everlasting chisel Patent information.
967,837 Aug. 16, 1910 Bit brace chuck Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT Ratchet mechanism.
981,693 Jan. 17, 1911 Connection for bit-brace bows Edmond A. Schade New Britain, CT
1,047,126 Dec. 10, 1912 Tool-sharpening holder Joseph M. Hance New Britain, CT This is the Stanley No. 200 cutter and chisel grinder.
1,057,582 Apr. 01, 1913 Jointer-gage attachment for planes Albert F. Schade New Britain, CT This is the patent for the Stanley 386 jointer gauge.
1,132,550 Mar. 23, 1915 Chuck Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,188,363 Jun. 20, 1916 Bit-brace Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT
1,198,609 Sep. 19, 1916 Process of Making Tool Shanks and Handles George A. Wood Southington, CT Applicable to both screwdrivers and chisel handles and reported to be used for both the Everlasting Chisel line as well as the Hurwood Screwdriver lines by Stanley. The tool handle is made forming a flange on the lower portion, applying the handle, forming a flange on the top and then bending the flanges over to secure the handle (may be either single or multiple piece handle).Screwdriver example marked with both 9/19/1916 Patent date as well as the 5/11/1915 patent date1,139,392, it was also marked 'NO-Bust'
1,203,417 Oct. 31, 1916 Miter-box Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT The patent mainly covers the length stop.
    Miter-box Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT  
1,367,462 Feb. 01, 1921 Tool for forming round dowels and rods Edward A. Cherry Brooklyn, NY
D57,578 Apr. 26, 1921 Design for a Saw-Set Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,378,650 May. 17, 1921 Saw-Set Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Example marked with this patent and 1,199,232
1,412,609 Apr. 11, 1922 Gauge for Carpenters' Planes and the Like George Eger Plainville, CT
1,438,236 Dec. 12, 1922 Folding Rule Walter H. Hart New Britain, CT One of three folding rule joint patents issued to Stanley on this date (see also 1,438,234 and 1,438,235). This patent date is marked on some zig-zag rules, but it is not clear exactly which patent(s) are used since hte three patents are all very similar.
    Folding Rule David Gould New Britain, CT  
1,438,234 Dec. 12, 1922 Folding Rule Walter H. Hart New Britain, CT One of three folding rule joint patents issued to Stanley on this date (see also 1,438,235 and 1,438,236). This patent date is marked on some zig-zag rules, but it is not clear exactly which patent(s) are used since the three patents are all very similar.
    Folding Rule David Gould New Britain, CT  
1,438,235 Dec. 12, 1922 Folding Rule Walter H. Hart New Britain, CT One of three folding rule joint patents issued to Stanley on this date (see also 1,438,234 and 1,438,236). This patent date is marked on some zig-zag rules, but it is not clear exactly which patent(s) are used since the three patents are all very similar.
    Folding Rule David Gould New Britain, CT  
1,493,176 May. 06, 1924 Hand Tool George A. Wood Southington, CT Improvement over the Wood family's (George E. - father, and George A.) previous chisel patents and applies to securing the ferrule to the shank. The shank has a pair of logitudinally spaced shoulders that the ferrule is contracted around to ensure is does not come loose with continued use.
1,493,141 May. 06, 1924 Hand drill frame Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT First of three consecutive patents. The next is 1,493,142
1,493,171 May. 06, 1924 Shears François Alexis Henri Deschâtres , France The 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., tells us that the U.S. rights to this patent were owned by the Stanley Works. See this patent's reissue for more information.
    Shears Huber Gaston Raphael Vulliet , France  
1,493,165 May. 06, 1924 Screw Driver Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT This Patent relates to a less expensive way to reinforce the handle.Instead of forming the shank and blade after the handle, the blade and shank can formed then inserted into the handle a cap can be threaded on to the shaft after. The example does not have threads to attach the cap but it is forced on .Example marked with the TmBB trade mark, Hurwood, Made in USA Pat.1493165.
1,493,142 May. 06, 1924 Hand drill pedestal Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Second of three consecutive patents. The next is 1,493,143
1,493,143 May. 06, 1924 Hand drill pedestal Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Third of three consecutive patents. The first is 1,493,141
1,515,239 Nov. 11, 1924 Spirit Level Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT
1,527,785 Feb. 24, 1925 Plane Ray L. Carter Syracuse, NY Ray L. Carter invented the router when he modified an electric tool for barbers. His business was acquired by the Stanley Works in the early 1930s, and subsequently operated as the R. L. Carter Division. This patent number—along with patent 1,658,185—was seen on a Model SPN power planer from Mall Tool Co., and called the "Electric Mall Plane".
1,529,006 Mar. 10, 1925 Bit-Brace Extension Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,536,758 May. 05, 1925 Hand drill or the like Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,551,501 Aug. 25, 1925 Measuring Rule William Lewis Hurlburt New Britain, CT Hinge and saw kerf is modified to reduce the depth of cut for the hinge leaf inserted in the wood. The hinge leaf now has two distinct semicircular projections instead of one larger one.
1,551,521 Aug. 25, 1925 Joint for Tools and the Like Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT This is an improved design for the construction of squares, and the joint between the blade and stck in particular.
This patent was assigned to Stanley, but never used on any of their production tools.
1,553,794 Sep. 15, 1925 Process of Making Hand Tools George A. Wood Southington, CT Improved construction method with the shank made of two pieces with the two pieces joined using an electric weld.
    Process of Making Hand Tools George E. Wood Southington, CT  
1,553,642 Sep. 15, 1925 Carpenters' Plane Philip B. Stanley New Britain, CT One of four patents issued to Stanley for their system for replaceable blades for woodworking planes. The system included the replaceable blades, a blade holder, and a specially designed capiron to fit over the replaceable blades. Stanley marketed the system from 1925 to 1932 in 3 widths: 1 3/4"; 2"; and 2 3/8". The claims for this patent are for the blade holder and the means for holding the replaceable blades with screws.

This patent, along with 1,440,649 for a plane designed to hold the Ready Edge blade (not known to have been produced), 1,651,634 for an improvement to the bladeholder, and 1,662,005 for a hinged bladeholder (not known to have been produced) covered the Ready Edge blade system. Although two of Stanley's major inventors worked on this project, the system evidently did not enjoy commercial sucess and the blades remain rare.
1,562,862 Nov. 24, 1925 Ratchet screw driver Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,562,933 Nov. 24, 1925 Measuring rule Henry S. Walter New Britain, CT
    Measuring rule Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT  
1,642,986 Sep. 20, 1927 Hand drill Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Produced as Stanley's No 519
1,643,524 Sep. 27, 1927 Plane Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT The Stanley #164 low angle plane
1,644,326 Oct. 04, 1927 Portable motor-driven saw John M. Crowe Kenton County, KY Subsequently improved in patent 1,780,174.
An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and listing patent 1,830,350, patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
The innovations in this patent are an improved arrangement of handles, an improved adjustable depth gauge, and an improved blade guard and lock.
1,651,634 Dec. 06, 1927 Carpenter's Plane Edmund A. Schade New Britain, CT Thin and shallow cutter with notches or passages in the rear of the edge and is secured it between the cap and body of an ordinary plane iron. This patent seeks to address the problem that detachable cutters require departure from standard plane construction and that the cutter is not rigid enough when planing hard wood.
This patent along with three others: 1,440,649,1,553,642, and 1,662,005 were the basis and improvement of Stanley's Ready Edge blades.
1,658,185 Feb. 07, 1928 Tool-grinding mechanism Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY Ray L. Carter invented the router when he modified an electric tool for barbers. His business was acquired by the Stanley Works in the early 1930s, and subsequently operated as the R. L. Carter Division. This patent number—along with patent 1,527,785—was seen on a Model SPN power planer from Mall Tool Co., and called the "Electric Mall Plane".
1,662,005 Mar. 06, 1928 Carpenter's Plane Charles A. Johnson Unionville, CT Further refinement of the thin replaceable (i.e. razor) blade concept. The blade is now secured by a hinge and "cam-like" action between the cutter (grooved), securing plate, and cap iron.
This patent along with three others: 1,440,649, 1,553,642, and 1,651,634 were the basis and improvement of Stanley's Ready Edge blades.
1,688,533 Oct. 23, 1928 Combination Workbench and Tool Holder George Eger New Britain, CT Sold by Stanley as the No. 859 and No. 860 Workbench and Tool Cabinet. The hinged lid for the cabinet serves as the work bench top.
RE17,139 Nov. 20, 1928 Shears François Alexis Henri Deschâtres , France The 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., tells us that the U.S. rights to this patent were owned by the Stanley Works. This patent number, along with patent numbers 1,765,317 and 1,796,812, was seen on a Stanley Unishear.
Claim 15 of this patent was key in the above-mentioned lawsuit. "15. An automatic shears for cutting sheet metal, comprising a pair of fixed and movable overlapping, cutting blades having their cutting edges forming an acute angle, a carrier for the movable blade, means for giving to said carrier a reciprocatory movement of such small amplitude as to cause only a short intermediate part of the cutting edge of the movable blade to cross and recross the cutting edge of the fixed blade, and a rigid frame formed to provide a guideway embracing the carrier of the movable blade and a rigid support for the fixed blade and to provide guiding means with clearance space extending rearwardly and outwardly from the apex of the angle formed by the cutting edges of the blades to permit relative turning of the blades and the sheet metal during the operation of the movable blade."
According to the lawsuit, this patent was licensed to the French firm of Achard et Cie, which manufactured this invention as the "Monobloc". Messrs. Heller and Steindorff (see, e.g., patent 1,775,787) established Unishear Co., Inc., to sell these shears, which they licensed (to sell, not to manufacture) from assignee Gueneau. They asked Gueneau to get a reissue of the patent to strengthen the claims. Co-inventor Deschâtres refused to sign the application which was then rejected for the lack of his signature; Deschâtres was then sued (in France) and forced to sign a new reissue application. Meanwhile, Unishear ran into quality and delivery issues with the imported Monobloc shears and began manufacturing a copy. Gueneau sued Unishear and, in the settlement, granted Unishear a license to manufacture; that settlement was signed a day before the second application for reissue was made.
Still with us? It gets messier. Shortly before the settlement agreement was assigned and the section reissue application was made, Unishear introduced a handheld shear, the Mighty Midget, which did not infringe the original Vulliet-Deschâtres patent but did infringe claim 15 of the reissue. Then, in October 1929 Unishear sold out to The Stanley Works and assigned them the various Steindorff and Ungar patents as well as this Vulliet-Deschâtres patent and its reissue. Achard et Cie, the original patent licensee, signed off on this arrangement, and Gueneau did not dispute it. The lawsuit Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., then, was filed by Stanley Works when the defendant sold a sheet metal cutting tool made by Black & Decker that infringed the Vulliet-Deschâtres reissued patent. The court ultimately ruled the reissue to be invalid because the application for reissue was too long delayed.
    Shears Huber Gaston Raphael Vulliet , France  
1,716,744 Jun. 11, 1929 Line level Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,721,065 Jul. 16, 1929 Hand tool Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
293,620 Oct. 01, 1929 Portable shears Gustave Adolphe Ungar Pelham Manor, NY This patent is the Canadian equivalent of US Patent 1,848,147; see that patent for more information. This Canadian patent number along with its US equivalent and others, were listed on a Stanley Unishear.
1,738,227 Dec. 03, 1929 Mortising machine Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY Door-lock mortiser; an improvement to patent 1,642,723.
1,746,692 Feb. 11, 1930 Saw Set Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Stanley #442. Example also marked with 1,945,335.
1,765,321 Jun. 17, 1930 Bench Vise Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT Few parts with simple construction. Produced as the No 700 vise by Stanley.
1,765,317 Jun. 17, 1930 Cutting blade for shears Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY This patent was mentioned in passing in the 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., as having been withdrawn shortly before the lawsuit was filed. This patent number, along with patent numbers 17,139 and 1,796,812, was seen on a Stanley Unishear.
1,765,313 Jun. 17, 1930 Portable shears Ulrich F. L. Steindorff New York, NY
    Portable shears Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY  
1,766,364 Jun. 24, 1930 Ratchet Feeding Device John A. Waller Los Angeles, CA This is an enhancement to Waller's earlier patent (1,603,652), that adds a ratchet mechanism to help hold the tool in position when cutting.
1,775,787 Sep. 16, 1930 Power-driven shears Herbert J. Heller New York, NY The 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., tells us that the U.S. rights to this patent were owned by the Stanley Works, and the patent was withdrawn shortly before the lawsuit was filed.
    Power-driven shears Ulrich F. L. Steindorff New York, NY  
1,775,791 Sep. 16, 1930 Cutting shears and driving mechanism therefor Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY
1,780,174 Nov. 04, 1930 Portable power saw John M. Crowe Covington, KY An improvement to patent 1,644,326.
An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and listing patent 1,830,350, patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
The improvements are a double gear reduction and a latch mechanism for the guard.
1,784,380 Dec. 09, 1930 Bit or Drill Holder Walter B. Murdoch New Britain, CT
1,796,812 Mar. 17, 1931 Shears Herbert J. Heller New York, NY The 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., tells us that the U.S. rights to this patent were owned by the Stanley Works. This patent number, as well as patent numbers 1,765,317 and 17,139, were seen on a Stanley No. 16A Unishear.
    Shears Ulrich F. L. Steindorff New York, NY  
309,995 Mar. 31, 1931 Cutting shears Herbert Joseph Heller New York, NY This seems to be the Canadian equivalent of US patent 1,775,787; see that patent for more information.
    Cutting shears Ulrich Franz Ludwig Steindorff New York, NY  
    Cutting shears Gustave Adolphe Ungar Pelham Manor, NY  
1,800,338 Apr. 14, 1931 Beveling, Grooving, and Cutting Tool Charles A. Chapman Estes Park, CO The Stanley #193 family of fiberboard planes for use on Celotex.
1,801,035 Apr. 14, 1931 Shaping machine Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY
1,803,004 Apr. 28, 1931 Template for tool designing Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY
1,805,164 May. 12, 1931 Shaft holder for applying chucks Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY
1,811,577 Jun. 23, 1931 Hand tool John M. Crowe Covington, KY Improvements related to patent 1,780,174.
An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and listing patent 1,830,350, patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
The innovation in this patent is an improved guard latch release.
1,813,231 Jul. 07, 1931 Motor driven hand tool John M. Crowe Covington, KY Innovations are related to the blade guard and its associated handle.
1,818,823 Aug. 11, 1931 Brace Bit Extension Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,821,436 Sep. 01, 1931 Portable power driven tool John J. Holloway New Britain, CT
1,825,936 Oct. 06, 1931 Ratchet mechanism Christian Bodmer New Britain, CT
1,828,401 Oct. 20, 1931 Resilient rule Hiram A. Farrand Berlin, NH appears on tape measure with two other Lufkin patents 1,964,280 and 1,973,843. This patent number also appears on some Stanley tapes.
1,829,393 Oct. 27, 1931 Combined router and shaper Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY
1,830,350 Nov. 03, 1931 Miter cutting motor driven hand tool John M. Crowe Covington, KY An improvement to patent 1,644,326 and patent 1,780,174.
An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and also listing patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
1,839,835 Jan. 05, 1932 Screw driver Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT One of these appeared in a Martin J. Donnelley auction
1,841,787 Jan. 19, 1932 Sanding and polishing machine Ray L. Carter Phoenix, NY
1,843,655 Feb. 02, 1932 Cutting shear Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY This patent was mentioned in passing in the 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co., as having been withdrawn shortly before the lawsuit was filed.
1,846,749 Feb. 23, 1932 Mortising machine Harry T. Parker Oakland, CA This machine creates the mortises for window pulleys such at that in patent 1,625,640.
1,847,278 Mar. 01, 1932 Hammer Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,848,147 Mar. 08, 1932 Portable shears Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY This patent was mentioned in the 1940 lawsuit, Stanley Works v. C. S. Mersick Co. See also Canada patent {CA296,320}.
1,848,145 Mar. 08, 1932 Power driven shears Ulrich F. L. Steindorff New York, NY
    Power driven shears Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY  
1,850,297 Mar. 22, 1932 Bit or Drill Holder Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT
1,856,044 Apr. 26, 1932 Combination shelf bracket and garmet hanger rack Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,857,167 May. 10, 1932 Power-driven shears for cutting sheet material such as metal, leather, cardboard or the like Gustave A. Ungar Pelham Manor, NY
    Power-driven shears for cutting sheet material such as metal, leather, cardboard or the like Herbert J. Heller New York, NY  
    Power-driven shears for cutting sheet material such as metal, leather, cardboard or the like Ulrich F. L. Steindorff New York, NY  
1,879,454 Sep. 27, 1932 Mortising Tool Harry T. Parker New Britain, CT This is a simple tool to mark a butt mortise. The tools is positioned in place on the door, and the two blades struck with a hammer. This will not only mark the sides of the mortise, but hold the tool in place to allow the attached fence to be used to guide a chisel to cut the mortise.
It is very similar in concept to the D.S. Humphrey patent (#1,008,826 - 11/14/1911), but adds cutting edges for the sides of the mortise.
This tool was produced from 1930-1957 by Stanley, but it apparently never caught on with carpenters. The tool is fairly rare today.
1,879,583 Sep. 27, 1932 Three way bending iron Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,880,521 Oct. 04, 1932 Bit or drill holder Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
326,991 Oct. 18, 1932 Power driven cutting shears Gustave Adolphe Ungar Pelham Manor, NY This is the Canadian equivalent of U.S. patent 1,843,655; see that patent for more information.
1,906,657 May. 02, 1933 Scraper Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,907,459 May. 09, 1933 Folding rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,915,636 Jun. 27, 1933 Tool for Slicing Wall Board and the Like Frederick S. Wendelken Denver, CO
1,917,779 Jul. 11, 1933 Scraper Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT The Stanley #82 scraper.
1,918,750 Jul. 18, 1933 Plane Earl V. Higbee New Britain, CT The kidney-shaped hole in Stanley levercaps. Prevents the levercap from moving backwards under heavy planing.
1,940,438 Dec. 19, 1933 Punch Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,942,316 Jan. 02, 1934 Stream Line Wire Wrench Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT "The aim of the present invention is to provide a wrench of such construction that it may be employed to turn stream line wires and the like without danger of damaging the edges thereof or otherwise mutilating the wires."
The slotted openings in the wrenches engage the wire on the wider part of the strand rather than on the thinner edges.
1,945,335 Jan. 30, 1934 Saw Set Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Stanley's #442. Example also marked with 1,746,692
1,952,518 Mar. 27, 1934 miter box Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,953,637 Apr. 03, 1934 Chuck Hinman L. Smith New Britain, CT
    Chuck Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT  
1,956,275 Apr. 24, 1934 Cutting Tool Harris J. Cook New Britain, CT The Stanley #193 family of fiber board planes. The last plane patent issued to Stanley.
1,956,882 May. 01, 1934 Tool holder Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,958,024 May. 08, 1934 Friction Spring Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Placed in a recess within a groove, the spring is held in place and then the spring exerts pressure to keep the caliper or sliding device pressed against the undercut of the groove.

It is interesting to note that this device is show with what will become the Stanley 136 rule which was introduced in the following year of the application. Use was most likey deemed unnecessary on an inexpensive rule and the economy of the early 1930s most likely didn't help with widespread adoption and application.
1,959,936 May. 22, 1934 Vise Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Stanley Defiance #1210. Patent #s 1,959,936 & 1,999,600 stamped on mounting bracket behind screw.
1,969,677 Aug. 07, 1934 Safety holder for tools Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,978,887 Oct. 30, 1934 Folding extension rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
1,983,503 Dec. 04, 1934 Measuring Rule Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT This patent and 1,964,280 are found on the Stanley tape No. 6386. John Walter's book says that Stanley had a cross licensing agreement with Lufkin.
1,984,951 Dec. 18, 1934 Combination Square Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT This patent further improves Christian Bodmer's square designs (1,213,578, 1,322,086) used for many years by Stanley, bu lengthening the locking shaft so that the head could be swung compeltely around.
1,999,600 Apr. 30, 1935 Vise Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Stanley Defiance #1210 Patent #s 1,959,936 & 1,999,600 stamped on mounting bracket behind screw.
2,014,709 Sep. 17, 1935 Line Level Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT Simple and economic aluminum sheet metal body construction and means for attaching/securing the level to a line. Sold by Stanley as the Defiance No. 1287 Line Level.
D98,098 Jan. 07, 1936 Design for a casing for flexible measuring rules Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT This patent covers the case designs for Stanley models 3206 and 3306.
D98,554 Feb. 11, 1936 Design for a casting for flexible measuring rules Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT This patent covers the case design for the Stanley model 7506, among others.
2,048,652 Jul. 21, 1936 Combination hand tool and spark tester Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
2,052,259 Aug. 25, 1936 Coilable measuring device Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
2,127,443 Aug. 16, 1938 Coilable measuring rule Albert Stanely Duncan New Britain, CT
    Coilable measuring rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT  
2,131,694 Sep. 27, 1938 Coilable measuring rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Produced by Stanley as the Defiance Tape Rule No. 1262 from 1950 – 1954 only as a 6 foot model.
2,131,695 Sep. 27, 1938 Inside wind coilable measuring rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
2,156,905 May. 02, 1939 Coilable measuring rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
2,158,024 May. 09, 1939 Coilable measuring rule Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT
2,158,970 May. 16, 1939 Illuminated hand tool Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT One of these appeared in a Martin J. Donnelly auction. Martin surmises that there was only a single production run of this tool before Stanley switched over to war production.
2,228,664 Jan. 14, 1941 Portable saw Cedric Powers New Britain, CT An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and also listing patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
The innovation is an adjustable mounting for the worm gear on the saw arbor, which allows the alignment of the gears after the saw has been assembled. This was intended to eliminate the need to repeatedly assemble and disassemble the saw to properly align the gearing. The patent also covers improvements to the saw handle.
    Portable saw Lucius M. Knouse New Britain, CT  
2,263,136 Nov. 18, 1941 Handle structure for portable saws Cedric Powers New Britain, CT An example has been reported, labeled, "Stanley Safety Saw", and also listing patent 2,228,664 and patent 2,263,136. It was purchased in early 1947.
The innovation is in improved handles with duplex grips and a switch on each handle.
    Handle structure for portable saws Lucius M. Knouse New Britain, CT  
2,287,457 Jun. 23, 1942 Screw driver Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT This is Stanley's no. 88 tool handle.
    Screw driver Frederick A. Volz New Britain, CT  
2,315,132 Mar. 30, 1943 Safety shield for bench grinders Cedric Powers New Britain, CT
2,485,991 Oct. 25, 1949 Ratchet end for brace bits Austin L. Stowell New Britain, CT Seen on a Stanley 923 brace.
D160,541 Oct. 17, 1950 Marking Gauge Harold R. Rippon East Lynn, MA The last of the great marking gage patents by Stanley, and the first marking gage they got a design patent for. This patent covers the last model of the Stanley #65, which also holds utility patent 2,579,205.
2,579,205 Dec. 18, 1951 Marking Gauge Harold R. Rippon East Lynn, MA The last of the great marking gage patents by Stanley. This one covers a simple marking gauge with a triangular head and diamond-shaped bar. The basic design is also covered by design patent 160,541.
The configuration of the head and bar makes it lock straight and securely, while keeping the bar out of the way of the point. This is an excellent design, and works very well. It was used on the Stanley #65 from 1949 on, and was also adapted for the last few years of production on the #61.
2,655,964 Oct. 20, 1953 Screw Taper Drill Attachment Joseph A. Labbee Jr. Providence, RI Tapered drill including provisions for countersinking for wood screws formed of sheet metal.

Referenced patents include: Lewis' 60,207; Monson's 104,335; Southwick's 252,704; Champion's 362,934; Latham's 716,441; Wagner's 1,047,466; Schubnel's 1,479,325; and Myers' 1,535,941
2,672,172 Mar. 16, 1954 Electric plane Wilbur G. Lee Berlin, CT
    Electric plane James H. Godfrey Berlin, CT  
2,828,784 Apr. 01, 1958 Saw blade guard for power driven portable circular saw with tiltable table Kestutis Damijonaitis Newington, CT
3,121,957 Feb. 25, 1964 Coilable metal rule William G. Brown New Britain, CT Stanley tape measure marked with this patent number observed.
3,585,662 Jun. 22, 1971 Manually actuatable tool Alfred Z. Boyajian Manhattan Beach, CA This patent was improved in patent 3,716,879 and was manufactured by Stanley and sold as their Jobmaster bolt cutter.
3,716,879 Feb. 20, 1973 Manually actuatable tool Alfred Z. Boyajian Manhattan Beach, CA This patent improves on patent 3,585,662 to make the design more practical. This patent number has been seen on a Stanley Jobmaster bolt cutter.